• Reinstate the Postgraduate Student Allowance for 2019
    Labour made a promise they will reinstate the Postgraduate Student Allowances which the National Government removed in 2013. However they have not set a date and in the meantime students planning to continue or enter postgraduate study are left in limbo. At the present time a student is only eligible if they are doing a Bachelor degree with Honours. No postgraduate students (4th year students who want to further their studies) are able to get a Postgraduate Student Allowance. This impacts most on students who can’t rely on financial support from their families and means they graduate in much higher debt, creating stress when entering the workforce. These students are our future scientists, doctors and business leaders. Most will already have debt from their undergraduate studies and should not be discouraged from finishing further study in their chosen field New Zealand should not limit the ability of individuals from all backgrounds to reach their potential. Ask Labour to keep its promise and reinstate the Postgraduate Student Allowance so our young women and men can reach their full potential! https://www.labour.org.nz/tertiaryeducation
    31 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Pip Clere
  • Golden Bay Local Board: local decisions by local people
    Golden Bay is defined as an 'isolated distinct community' under the Local Government Act, requiring specific political representation. This is due partly to its geographic remoteness (2 hours drive from the District Council offices), but also to its unique culture, history and social values arising from a close relationship to its pristine natural environment, diverse peoples and communities, and other socio-economic difference to the wider Tasman region. The Tasman District Council continues to make decisions over Golden Bay's local governance issues which do not reflect our community's local knowledge, customs and interests. TDC has refused to delegate powers to the GB Community Board (the community's elected representative body) as required within the spirit of the Local Government Act, and often ignore its recommendations. This lack of local democracy negatively impacts our community's ability to optimise our current and future well being. One example of the negative impacts from the lack of local democracy is TDCs decision making over a local recreational facility (a grandstand).* TDC voted to demolish the facility, ignoring the Community Board recommendation to retain the historic building highly valued by a significant section of the community. After $200,000 in legal costs and much public protest (reported in the national press) TDC rescinded their decision but continue to frustrate local community efforts to cost-efficiently maintain this building for community use. *https://www.stuff.co.nz/nelson-mail/opinion/81626242/golden-bay-grandstands-demolition-decision-shut-public-out
    83 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Working Group for a Golden Bay Local Board
  • Fix the broken promise: Fund RNZ and NZ on Air
    The Government has broken its promise to boost funding for public interest media by $38million extra funding.[1] Instead, it has only allocated $15million to fund the recommendations of the interim commission on public broadcasting.[2] That’s a drop in the bucket. Well funded quality public interest journalism is critical to make sure we enhance our transparent democracy. It’s been underfunded for decades and the Minister had promised to fix that. Yet the Government has broken that promise. Now is the time to call on the Government to fix that promise. Sign the petition to fix the broken promise and fund RNZ and NZ on Air. 1 - https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/mediawatch/audio/2018619322/new-government-new-plans-for-broadcasting 2- https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/103954272/Budget-2018-No-payday-yet-for-RNZ-from-Labour-Budget
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    Created by Team ActionStation Picture
  • It’s time for equal access
    One in four Kiwis have a disability and face barriers in their day-to-day lives – many of which involve difficulty accessing buildings and public spaces, public transport, education, employment, information, and services. When we encounter these barriers, it is currently up to us to fight for them to be removed, repaired, or remediated. Having to grapple with these is exhausting. One day at university, I got stuck in a lift because the Braille I needed to be able to touch on the buttons was covered by a thick sheet of plastic. While stuck there, I got thinking: how great would it be if we had a legally-binding system in New Zealand that focused on proactively ensuring our vibrant country is equally accessible to everyone, instead of relying on us as disabled individuals to prove we've been discriminated against and have to wrestle with one barrier after another? It's time to change the system. I'm 22 and I want to be able to tell my future kids that the law in Aotearoa is clear: it says that accessibility is a priority, and as such, recognises that we deserve access to the premises and services of business, education providers, construction workers and transport operators as much as every other New Zealander. We want the freedom to live our lives how we choose; we want to use our time and energy to contribute to the economy and our communities. I am part of the Access Matters campaign, a coalition of disabled people, disability organisations, and our supporters who are mobilising to challenge all political parties to be proactive about accessibility by committing to introduce mandatory and enforceable accessibility legislation and standards. Accessibility is too important to be swamped down by party politics; now is the time for consensus. We will present this letter to the leaders of all political parties as soon as the new electoral term begins asking for it to be a cross-party priority for the new parliament. I need your help to make that happen - add your name now to support equal access for everyone. Áine Kelly-Costello - disabled person, student, employee, friend
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    Created by Áine Kelly-Costello Picture
  • Fair Play for Public Holidays
    Shift workers deserve the same rewards as Monday to Friday workers! At the moment, Monday to Friday workers get 11 paid days off a year, via Mondayisation if a public holiday falls on a weekend, and because many holidays fall on a Monday. If they have to work on the public holiday they are guaranteed a day in lieu and time and a half. They are never required to work on Easter Sunday. Meanwhile, as an example, Mary the shift worker works a 4 on, 2 off roster. If her normal days off happen to fall on a public holiday, she doesn't get any extra paid days off as would happen for a Monday to Friday worker through Mondayisation. It would just be a standard week's wage and no extra time off. Too bad for her! Or, Brian works Tuesday to Saturday every week and misses out on an extra paid day off every time there's a Public Holiday on a Monday. And Harry works Sundays to Thursdays so has to work Easter Sunday on his normal rate but misses out on having Good Friday as a paid holiday as it's his regular day off. Is that fair? And how fried is your brain? Wouldn't it be better to just give everyone the same number of paid Public Holidays every year, whether in lieu or on the day? There are many people out there working weekends and crazy routines in order to keep our essential services going. They deserve at least the same number of paid days off a year as Monday to Friday workers, or fair compensation for working on important calendar days.
    37 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Maria O'Mara
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