• Press Pause on the Charities Act changes
    The charities sector, accountable first to the communities of Aotearoa, plays an important independent role in our democracy. With over 28,000 registered charities in New Zealand, the Charities Amendment Bill will have a far reaching impact in the for-purpose (aka the ‘not-for-profit’) sector. It has been asked whether the Charities Amendment Bill is a ‘wolf in sheep’s clothing’. While some elements of the Bill are helpful and look good, the devil is in the detail. Government says the Bill will ‘modernise’ the Charities Act 2005. In fact, much of the Bill ensures greater Government control of the charities sector, reduced sectoral independence, and a reduction thereby of the sector’s essential contribution to democracy. It was Labour Party policy for the 2017 election to “prioritise the long-promised first principles review of the Charities Act”. This would include ensuring that charities can engage in advocacy without fear of losing their charitable status. The Minister now says this review is not needed. Any legislation impacting on this sector needs to provide an enabling framework rather than one that restricts the sector from being a voice for its communities. This will be the last chance for the Act to be independently reviewed for many years to come. The petition can be signed by an individual or an organisation, or by both, separately. Please complete this signing by midday on 8th December, so it can be submitted to the Select Committee in time. We encourage you to make your own submission by emailing the Select Committee directly at [email protected] or using this online form on the Parliament website: https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/sc/make-a-submission/document/53SCSS_SCF_BILL_127163/charities-amendment-bill
    129 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Tim Howard
  • Make other votes count Whangarei - Change to the single transferable vote system
    Our Whangarei  local body elections currently use the First Past the Post (FPP) voting system. If the candidate we vote for does not make the threshold, our votes are "wasted". The Single Transferable Vote (STV) system will allow us  freedom of choice to rank our candidates and still elect someone in of our choice without  "wasting" votes. When our votes are guaranteed to count like this, vote wastage and vote splitting is eliminated.
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Fiona Green
  • Stop "wasted" votes influencing Auckland's future - change to the Single Transferable Vote system
    Our Auckland local elections currently use the First Past the Post (FPP) voting system. If the candidate we vote for doesn't make the threshold, our votes are "wasted". There is a modern alternative. The Single Transferable Vote (STV) system will allow us the freedom of choice to rank our candidates and recycle our "wasted" votes. When our votes are guaranteed to count like this, it shows more respect to our individual sovereignty and needs, rather than forcing us to vote under the duress of the fear of "wasted" votes "vote-splitting". At least 1,863 voters wasted their vote when they voted for me in the Waitematā Local Board elections this year, under the current voting system (FPP). My favorite local board candidate would have been voted in if those 1,863 "wasted" votes would have been recycled under STV for him. I didn't know such an awesome fellow was running until I was already nominated, and I continued to run partly because there was a possibility that we could both be elected, and partly so I could speak up and illustrate with a poignant lived experience that the ability to recycle votes does matter in practice and not just in theory. Under FPP, neither of us two made the voting threshold. We wasted at least 9,139 votes - that's 10,000 people who spent at least an hour on this, 10,000 total work-hours of people doing their civic duty, wasted.... That's a problem for all FPP democracies, but there is a local solution already ready for us if you want to choose it! Under Section 29[1] and 30[2] of the Local Electoral Act 2001, if I present Auckland Council with signatures with names and addresses of 5% of all Auckland enrolled voters, then they are forced by central government legislation to hold a vote on changing our voting system to, say, STV. STV doesn't have wasted votes like our current one. Other more progressive cities in New Zealand[3], such as Palmerston North, which I'm proud to originate from, have already had and passed voting system referendums to switch to STV, because it allows better representation and limits the possibility of duopoly party voting blocs just aiming to do the bare minimum to capture the middle vote and play to fears of "wasted" votes. STV allows voters to vote with truth in their hearts for what they truly believe is their best choice, safe in the knowledge that that vote will be reused and recycled towards their other choices if it is "wasted". This respects individual sovereignty better than FPP, because voters are less able to be manipulated by fears of vote-wasting. I would like to bring the wider choices that the residents of these other areas enjoy in their voting system, to Auckland. If you can help me with this, then please sign this petition with your name and electoral enrolment address in the Auckland region. I will not use your name or address for any other purpose other than Section 29 of the Local Electoral Act 2001. It is illegal under New Zealand law (the Privacy Act) for me to do anything else with your personal information except this. So please vote, for better voting! Ngā mihi, Andi Liu / 刘安迪 2022 Waitematā Local Board candidate and Waitematā and Gulf Ward candidate References: [1] https://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2001/0035/latest/DLM93979.html#DLM93979 [2] https://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2001/0035/latest/DLM93985.html#DLM93985 [3] https://www.dia.govt.nz/diawebsite.nsf/wpg_URL/Resource-material-STV-Information-Index
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    Created by Andi Liu Picture
  • Save all of Pt Chev's heritage Building One & realign the internal Gate 1 road!
    Solution vs Demolition: Our local and extended community love this building. We respect its past & the aspirations of mana whenua and Te Tiriti obligations. The Unitec/Carrington site is about to become an urban development of up to 3500 homes. We support affordable, well designed housing, open spaces and amenities that can coexist with scheduled heritage and an alternative internal roading access design. The building has had a history as a psychiatric hospital (1865-1992) & as the home of Unitec’s vibrant Architecture and Design School (1994-2021). Our community trust's 2020 feasibility study for MHUD on the interim adaptive reuse of Carrington Hospital's Building One had overwhelming community support to activate Building One as an Arts, Creative & Wellbeing hub. Built in 1865 and finished in 1905, it has a footprint of 8500sqm, over 2 main levels, with 300 studio spaces including a gallery, library & café. Partial demolition will remove over 600sqm of unique spaces that could have been used by community groups & creatives such as visual artists, dancers, film makers & educators. This building & environs will lose its connection to our community if partially demolished. This is an important valued landmark and reference point for our everyday neighbourhood interactions & wellbeing. We love the spaces, the ecology, the memory, the heritage & support the exciting opportunities to come. We need your help to share our message with people who care about heritage, can influence decision makers & show that the new road option is a "win/win, both/and" vs "either/or" solution. Join our Building One page here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/318949932076119 Read more about our proposed solution here: https://www.pcset.org.nz/projects
    1,067 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Chris Casey
  • Make our money reflect Aotearoa
    We have an opportunity to honour the people who have contributed to our nation and showcase more symbols that truly represent us as Aotearoa. We have so many people in our country's history that have paved the way for us to be where we are today and how we will be in the future. This is in opportunity to acknowledge and recognise their hard work. We also have so many symbols that are important to us. From trees like the pōhutukawa to plants like harakeke to birds like the huia, all of these and so much more reflect who we are as a country. Our currency is one of the most public and identifiable things in our country, let’s make our money reflect Aotearoa! Right now, our coins and $20 note features the British monarchy who will never live in our country, let alone represent us. This is why we are calling on the Reserve Bank to replace the British monarchy references in the next redesign of coins and notes for our country with people and symbols that represent the country we love. References: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/money/300683373/what-happens-now-to-new-zealands-coins-and-bank-notes https://www.renews.co.nz/why-im-respecting-but-not-mourning-queen-elizabeths-iis-death-opinion/?fbclid=IwAR3Cmr7SB3MoVzIHdPKsGeGet08sVPznSe8-sfg9sQT05mZ2GZI7Qn4E788
    2,059 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Te Matahiapo Safari Hynes Picture
  • Call on the Egyptian Government to end the death penalty
    In 2011, a civilian led movement held protests which resulted in the country’s long standing dictator President Hosni Mubarak resigning, and inspiring pro-equality and democracy movements around the world. But democracy was short-lived. On July 3, 2013, a military coup ousted the democratically elected President. Since 2014, the person who led the military coup, who was the Minister of Defense at the time, Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, has been the president of Egypt. Under President Sisi, people who have spoken out against his authoritarian government regime, including peaceful protestors and human rights advocates, have been arrested, executed and forced into exile. Mass trials of political opponents and reports of confessions forced under torture have become common place.(1,2,3) A 2021 stocktake of the situation in Egypt by Amnesty International found that human rights are severely repressed in the country. “Thousands of people, including human rights defenders, journalists, students, opposition politicians, business owners and peaceful protesters, remained arbitrarily detained. Dozens were convicted after grossly unfair trials or were tried by emergency courts on charges stemming from the peaceful exercise of their human rights. Enforced disappearances and torture continued unabated.” In October and November 2020, official reports are that 57 people were executed, although a pro-government media outlet reported 91 executions, citing anonymous official sources, over the same period. Egyptian authorities do not inform families or lawyers in advance of executions and people often die whilst in custody as a result of cruel conditions including lack of access to medical care.(3) Since 2013, hundreds of people have been killed in the streets, and the peaceful sit-ins that rejected the brutal coup were dispersed, resulting in massacres of civilians, the most famous of which were the Rabaa massacre and Al-Nahda massacre. (4) Climate justice requires an inclusive approach to environmental policy that embeds human rights and tackles system problems, including social injustice, ecological destruction, corruption, and social and economic inequality. COP27 cannot deliver climate justice while ignoring the Egyptian Government’s human rights abuses. Around the world in the lead up to COP27, people are taking action to call on their governments to use their diplomatic influence to join international efforts to push the Egyptian Government to end the death penalty and release the thousands of people who remain arbitrarily imprisoned.
    454 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Gasser Taher and Asmaa Shokr Picture
  • BUY BACK PUKETITI (Ōpua Headland)
    https://player.vimeo.com/video/724792566 Puketiti is historic land at the heart of the Ōpua community. This land was used as a strategic lookout by Pumuka and his people and as such, is a vital taonga to mana whenua. Imagine Pumuka scanning the Bay from the lookout. He would have extensive views up the Waikare Inlet, out towards the Black rocks and over the sea to the many visible Pa sites. He would see hundreds of waka transporting people and supplies across the water. Puketiti is a destination. A prominent destination for cyclists and walkers. A safe destination in a tsunami as evidenced in 2021. A perfect lookout to celebrate Matariki and our New Zealand history. A place for future generations to learn and be creative while surrounded by panoramic land and sea views, nature and history. If we do not act now this precious land covered in trees planted by past generations of school children, will be flattened, developed and turned into 17 premium residential sections. Puketiti and the lookout will be no more. I am in no doubt that the underhand way this land was sold was a purposeful act intending to mislead and undermine the Ōpua community and mana whenua. Secrecy appears to have been required to obtain resource consent for the building sites. Without the secrecy, I am certain that this project would have been stopped in its infancy. ‘Save Ōpua’s Soul’ (S.O.S.) is a group of concerned local residents who feel very strongly about the current loss of this land, the total lack of respect shown to mana whenua and the skulduggery surrounding the secrecy of this land sale. We ask FNHL and FNDC to listen to the people whom they represent. A mistake has been made so put it right - BUY BACK PUKETITI! This petition has been made in discussion with and full support of mana whenua who are also represented in our S.O.S membership. In our 2019 petition “Stop Puketiti Development”, we reached 1,232 online signatures! Links to further info: Newspaper Article covering land sale and occupation: https://www.stuff.co.nz/pou-tiaki/124139594/campaigners-plan-to-occupy-key-northland-land-until-its-made-into-a-reserve Newspaper Article covering land sale and protest: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/te-manu-korihi/428730/ngapuhi-protesters-prepared-to-stand-in-front-of-bulldozers-to-stop-development-on-wahi-tapu-land Waitangi Day Protest: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/northern-advocate/news/waitangi-day-labours-maori-caucus-met-with-small-protest-over-land-sale-at-te-tii-marae/LP2Z4EHZS3GWJWHYS6ZL6ZEGOM/ Facebook Page of occupation: https://www.facebook.com/TE-ROROA-KI-OPUA-105941851046020/
    546 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Paula Beck
  • Listen to the voices of Care Experienced Rangatahi: Stop the Oversight of Oranga Tamariki Bill
    This bill would disestablish the Children's Commissioner and will result in a weakening of independent monitoring of Oranga Tamariki and effective advocacy for children and young people. Tracie Shipton, CEO of VOYCE, shared concerns that “The Government has not listened to a single recommendation from young people with lived experience on this Bill. These young people have been effectively silenced, and the new systems outlined by the Bill is designed to further muffle and weaken their voices". We join with VOYCE and care experienced young people in calling for this bill to be stopped.
    1,881 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Aaron Hendry
  • Have your say on the Christchurch Stadium to save the climate
    The construction cost of the Christchurch Stadium is massive and there are a lot of GreenHouse Gases emitted during the manufacture and transportation of steel and concrete that is needed in large volumes for the Stadium’s proposed design. https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/climate-news/128957620/criticism-over-enormous-carbon-footprint-of-christchurchs-planned-stadium The current stadium has small crowds and the planned stadium is likely oversized. With an expected economic benefit over 25 years of $462.2 million and an expected cost over that time of $847 million (made up of $683m project cost + $4.2m x 25 years operating cost + $59m cost of land purchase), the stadium is expected to lose $385 million with a return of $0.55 on every dollar spent. (Numbers are from the Council's consultation page, and the cost of land purchase being additional was confirmed by email correspondence.) It does not make sense to push on with the Stadium. However previous Council decisions on the Stadium have had great interest from the rugby community, and the Crusaders chief executive has submitted for this consultation that he wants the Council to invest the additional $150 million to continue as planned. Last year, a petition signed by 24,000 people led to the Council opting for the $50m more expensive 30,000 seat option. The Canterbury Rugby Football Union has emailed the 25,000 in its database asking them to express support for the 30,000 seat covered Stadium on the Council's website, and the Canterbury Employers' Chamber of Commerce has encouraged its 2700 members to call for the stadium to be built without delay. This is why the submission YOU (Christchurch or neighbouring council resident) make is so important for ensuring a sensible decision is made. Only a week since consultation started and already 18,000 submissions have been received. Aside from some personal details, the consultation only has one question. Should the Council: - Invest an additional up to $150 million to enable the project to continue as planned, - Stop the project altogether, or - Pause and re-evaluate the project. Councillors have said that people may think they pay lip service to consultations, but they would all be paying close attention to this one. They have also said that letters to the editor, posts on facebook, petitions, etc. won't make any difference unless you actually make a submission. This petition will be closed after consultation closes on the 5th of July. So please make a submission now at Te Kaha multi-use arena budget consultation https://ccc.govt.nz/the-council/haveyoursay/show/514. It takes hardly any time to tick a box. Spread the word and if anyone knows someone in School Strike 4 Climate this may be something they would be interested in.
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Wiremu Thomson
  • Paihia Needs a Voice on our Future - bring the June 15th meeting to Paihia!
    Our Mayor and Far North District Councillors plan to hold a meeting about our Paihia Waterfront, outside of Pahia and exclude the public. They are saying the meeting is "Commercially sensitive". We say "no way!" Commercial interests cannot override open transparent decision-making. The Council and FNHL know how deeply concerned local residents are: - Councillor Kelly Stratford receipt of the 4000 signature 'No Sea Walls' petition 2021 - Community Board member Belinda Ward attended the vibrant Paihia public meeting 2021 - FNHL attended the powerful pleas at the Te Tii Marae hui 2021 - SEACHANGE group has spoken since 2020 at Council meetings. Imagine the future of our community if our needs are not taken into account. For the sake of our children, our grandchildren, and life in our beautiful Bay, everyone MUST be actively involved in decision-making. It's nonsensical to exclude Paihia Residents from decisions that affect us - and of course, that's what the law says too: Section 14 Local Government Act (2002): 'In performing its role, a local authority must act in accordance with the following principles: (a) a local authority should— (i) conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner; and (ii) give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner: (b) a local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all of its communities; and (c) when making a decision, a local authority should take account of— (i)the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests, within its district or region; and (ii) the interests of future as well as current communities; and (iii) the likely impact of any decision on each aspect of well-being referred to in section 10: (d) a local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes.' If we are to retain trust in the Council, our needs must be heard alongside those of FNHL and other contractors.
    310 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Jane Banfield
  • Make Civics Education a Core Subject in All New Zealand Secondary Schools.
    In New Zealand, we have less social cohesion, lowering levels of trust in the government and lowering voter turnout rates. These are urgent matters that require action. We believe it requires implementing education and training within schools so young people have the ability to learn before they are able to actively engage and understand how decisions are made. We believe this is one crucial action that will work towards a more democratic society. The 2020 general election showed that 78% of eligible voters from the age of 18 – 24 voted compared to 89.14% of eligible voters between the age of 65 – 69. The 2019 local body election showed that only 41.7% of all eligible voters voted. We can do better as a country. There is currently a School Leavers Toolkit (https://school-leavers-toolkit.education.govt.nz/en/government-and-voting/) which was announced by the Labour Government in 2019 as a resource to equip students with the core skills and knowledge they need to leave school. We agree with Chris Hipkins when he said “This is just a start” and while we appreciate the MoE acknowledging civics education is an integral part of a person's education. We want civics education in all New Zealad schools to be the end goal. We urge the Ministry of Education to create richer content to be taught in secondary schools in a way that is engaging, experiential and participatory whilst maintaining an apolitical tone that enables people to question and explore their own beliefs and values. “We need to make sure all our young people can leave school with the skills they need to get on in life…It shouldn’t be left to chance” – Chris Hipkins Civics in Schools is a group of passionate people who have a vision where every New Zealander is an active participant within our democratic processes. We want every person to have the tools and knowledge to vote, make informed decisions and effect change. We are a multi-generational group of people, campaigning and calling on Minister of Education – Hon Chris Hipkins, Associate Minister of Education – Jan Tinette, Associate Minister of Education (Māori Education) – Hon Kelvin Davis, Associate Minister of Education (Pacific Peoples) – Hon Aupito William Sio to make civics education a core subject within all New Zealand secondary schools. Civics in Schools in the media: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/local-government/127970420/petition-created-to-teach-civics-in-schools https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons/audio/2018834600/call-for-civics-to-be-a-core-subject-in-school-curricula
    500 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Joni Tomsett Picture
  • Urgently stop National Library from sending thousands of books to the Philippines
    This petition was closed Nov 1st and presented to the House of Representatives Nov 22 More info on the Parliament-site https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/petitions/document/PET_116636/petition-of-sandra-bianciardi-urgently-stop-national-library December 2021, Rachel Esson announced the suspension of disposals, and we learned later on in February through the Dominion and Stuff that "consultations" were to happen with the "stakeholders". But in reality nothing has happened over the last 6 months: eventually in July this year, Rachel Esson, clearly confirmed to an OIA inquiry that the agreement with Internet Archive has NOT been cancelled or modified. https://fyi.org.nz/request/19611-internet-archive-agreement-and-update-of-the-list-of-books-to-be-sent-to-the-philippines#incoming-74684 The list of 428,232 books destined to be digitised in the Philippines and leave New Zealand forever, is the same list as it was before Christmas 2021. Nothing allows us to believe that a discussion will openly take place, on the contrary, the National Library's declaration indicates it is going in exactly the opposite direction. Let’s read once more what R. Esson expressed in Stuff: “People care so passionately. But the world’s moved on, and we don’t need to keep these [books],” she says. “It’s not good for New Zealand, and for us, to keep them. And they’re not being used. And they’re available elsewhere. All those arguments. We’ll find a way through, but I’m not sure that we can please everyone.” (Stuff, https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/books/127618485/help-us-the-national-librarys-unsolvable-dilemma) Therefore, this petition is still as relevant as it was in its first days when it was launched by writers gathering at St Peter's Willis St, in DomStuff Nov 11, 2021. The voices heard at the event were very clear : https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/126965961/authors-gather-for-literary-protest-against-national-librarys-internet-archive-deal or check out Karyn Hay’s LATELY for a live cross just after the event https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/lately/audio/2018820187/authors-protest-national-library-book-disposal-in-wellington Here’s what you can do: Have a look and share your ideas on the facebook page "Writers Against National Library Disposals" https://www.facebook.com/groups/nodisposals Take a look at the list. Just scroll down to (or seek using Find) "Download the list of books": https://natlib.govt.nz/about-us/strategy-and-policy/collections-policy/overseas-published-collection-management the very identity and function of a National Library is called into question by its donation of the books to an overseas organisation, with no hope of ever recovering them. Therefore this petition not only asks for the Internet-Archive agreement to be cancelled, but also for public consultation about the future of the National Library of New Zealand, a library where professional librarians will be able to fill the collection with any books of the world they judge pertinent to New Zealand researchers and the public. "Who is Responsible" https://nodisposals.neocities.org/html/Who-Is-Responsible.html https://nodisposals.neocities.org/html/Situation-end-2021.html What has happened: Two years ago the National Library announced a plan to rid itself of most of its Overseas Published Collection. These books are national assets and should be treated this way. They contain a wealth of knowledge we do not want to lose. They will be costly to replace, and some will not be able to be replaced. Researchers, writers and students use this collection regularly. ▪︎ Over 600 000 books were initially slated for "secure destruction " by the National Library. ▪︎ The National Library's own statistics show these books are used about as much as any other part of the National Library's collection. ▪︎ 57 000 of the books were sent to a massive book sale at Trentham earlier this year. Approximately 10 000 sold. ▪︎ The National Library has entered into a contract to gift 428 000 books to an American company, Internet Archive, in return for digitising the books. The books will never come back again ▪︎ Internet Archive is facing a major lawsuit alleging breach of copyright in the USA and is opposed by writers and publishers groups nationally and internationally The National Library's rationale for getting rid of the books has shifted over time. ▪︎ It started as a cost saving exercise so it did not have to pay for storing them. "Secure destruction " was its original plan. Publishers figures for 2019 showed 2662 books were published in New Zealand. It would take 150 years to fill the space left by getting rid of the Overseas Published Collection. Extract from Scoop. 29 Oct "All the hard work of thoughtful librarians, their acquisitions and curation over the past century (and more), will be undone. The National Library is descended from the General Assembly Library, founded in 1862. (...) The books are part of our tradition. They are special items, not worthless, ageing assets – and their value is increasing with time. All attempts to persuade our politicians (...) have failed until now. These politicians, through the library’s directors, are effectively ‘legislating’ (in the philosophical sense) against our books. Public outcry is now our recourse." William Direen https://wellington.scoop.co.nz/?p=140249&fbclid=IwAR1tsZqoZ9uxsOyUS_acm17hmVrSgCJYMkcHqEUIDyMpiB263ZVJh5nNVRE We ask that ▪︎The contract with Internet Archive be cancelled Parliament must ensure that the National Library carries out its job in a careful, prudent way as envisaged by those who drafted the legislation it currently operates under.
    1,020 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Sandra Bianciardi