• Tell the SPCA to take Metro Paws to Court for Animal Cruelty
    Metro Paws Doggy Daycare has now been the subject of two separate SPCA investigations after more than 13 ex-staff members have reported witnessing animal abuse and more than 13 customers have alleged that their dogs have been severely injured at Metro Paws. Neither of these investigations have resulted in the SPCA taking Metro Paws to Court. The SPCA says it's because they don't have enough evidence and there's not enough public interest in the case. We believe that with so many direct eyewitnesses to abuse and with customers providing x-rays and veterinary records of their dog's injuries that match up with the stories that ex-staff are coming forward with, there is more then enough evidence to take them to Court. Several ex-staff members and customers say they have contacted the SPCA with these stories, only to have them close the case without even returning their calls. One person even claimed that when they tried to give information to help with the investigation, they were told that the SPCA didn't need any more information because they already had enough for the case. We want the SPCA to re-open their investigation into Metro Paws and to take them Court for these alleged animal welfare violations. We understand that the SPCA is an under-funded charity that does the best they can with the limited resources they have, which is why we also support SAFE's campaign asking the Government to establish a fully-funded Commissioner for Animals. Ultimately it should be the Government's responsibility to investigate and prosecute animal abuse instead of relying on charities to do it. The blame here doesn't lie with the SPCA, but with the severe lack of resources the Government puts into investigating and prosecuting animal cruelty cases. But until the Government steps up and establishes a fully-funded Commissioner for Animals, asking the SPCA to re-open the investigation into Metro Paws and to take them to Court is our best hope for getting justice for the dogs who have suffered at the hands of Metro Paws.
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  • Make All Resource Consents for Factory Farms Open to Public Submission
    The Waikato Regional Council is currently processing two applications to build industrial factory farms in the region. Buchanan Ellis Ltd have applied to build 6 new sheds that will house 42,000 chickens each in Waerenga and PIC New Zealand Limited have applied to triple the size of their commercial piggery to house 12,000 pigs in Maramarua. Both of these applications are limited notification, meaning the Council is not allowing the public the right to make submissions on these resource consents. We believe that factory farms are an issue of importance for the entire Waikato community due to animal welfare, environmental and health concerns, not just an concern for those who happen to live directly beside one. More than 70 percent of New Zealanders are opposed to factory farming and the overwhelming majority of Waikato residents do not want more factory farms built in our region. We should have the right to express this view to our local council in a healthy democracy.
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  • Ban the worst aspects of rodeo in Aotearoa New Zealand
    We're creating a future that ensures the rights of animals are respected and that they are no longer exploited for entertainment. Rodeos force animals to perform in various events in which ‘cowboys’ chase, wrestle, rope and ride calves, steers, bulls and horses. Animals used in rodeos are not wild animals. Usually calm bulls and horses are induced into aggressive behaviour by painful or irritating means such as bucking straps pulled tight around their hindquarters, electric prods, tail twisting and painful spurs – leading to aggravated and frightened animals who buck wildly. Terrified calves are chased and roped around the neck before being thrown to the ground. Rodeos are condemned both in New Zealand and internationally by veterinarians, animal welfare agencies and ex-rodeo riders. A number of countries have banned the practice, and in many countries, specific events such as calf roping and steer wrestling are outlawed on the grounds that they are cruel. The animals used in rodeos are stressed and frightened, unaware that it’s ‘just for entertainment.’ In addition to the distress rodeo events cause them, animals used can sustain injuries such as torn ligaments, broken bones, bruising and internal damage. In some cases, these injuries are so severe the animals die or are euthanised on site. Two bulls were killed in rodeos during the 2019/20 season. There are no public records on the number of animals killed and injured in rodeo training sessions. In 2018, the Government’s animal welfare advisors, the National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC), published a report entitled ‘Rodeo events – How do they impact the sentient animal?’ This report said NAWAC had ‘serious concerns’ over the ‘substantial negative impacts’ on animals that are used in steer wrestling and calf roping. They also said that bucking events, which use horses, bulls and steers, ‘have a variety of negative impacts’ on the animals. With such serious concerns and negative impacts highlighted by the Government’s own animal welfare advisors, it’s time for this cruelty to end. We’re Kiwis, not ‘cowboys.’ Help us make this rodeo’s last season. WATCH to see how animals are treated in New Zealand rodeos https://vimeo.com/476952416/066b723d43 READ - https://safe.org.nz/our-work/animals-in-need/rodeo/ - about the stress and suffering inflicted on animals in the various rodeo events DONATE [https://safe.org.nz/donate-now/donate/] to our campaign to end rodeo cruelty By signing this petition your information will be shared with SAFE, who will get in contact from time to time about this campaign and others. You are free to opt out at any time.
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  • Stop the Waerenga industrial meat chicken farm
    Chickens farmed for meat have been selectively bred to grow rapidly over a five-six week period before they are slaughtered. At five-six weeks old, they will reach adult weight but they are still baby chicks. This puts incredible stress on their young bodies which struggle under the rapid growth. Many chicks die before even reaching five-six weeks old. Others will suffer lameness due to severe stress on their hip and leg joints, affecting their ability to walk. Buchanan Ellis Ltd want to build a free-range industrial meat chicken farm at Waerenga - however free-range isn't all it's cracked up to be. There are no industry standards or regulations for free-range in New Zealand, only that there must be a potential to access the outdoors. Since most free-range meat chickens are slaughtered at five-six weeks old, the amount of time they have to go outside is only around two-three weeks. In their first few weeks of 'growing' they are shut inside industrial buildings with around 40,000 other meat chickens. In practice, many chickens will never get outside because they have to get past thousands of other chickens to reach ‘pop holes’ to the outdoors. In addition, chickens are hierarchical by nature, meaning dominant chickens will often guard pop holes, denying less dominant chickens outdoor access. The Buchanan Ellis Ltd proposal would see six industrial farm buildings built at the Waerenga site, each containing 43,000 meat chickens. This would see 258,000 meat chickens suffering on site every six week cycle. Over the course of a year around two million meat chickens would be grown at the proposed Buchanan Ellis Ltd factory farm. As well as animal welfare concerns, there is significant community opposition to the Buchanan Ellis Ltd proposal. Locals are concerned that odour and dust levels from the proposed industrial meat chicken farm will negatively impact their homes, health and livelihoods. Increased heavy traffic movements impacting on road safety, appropriate water drainage and effluent disposal and damage to nearby wetlands are also among the community concerns. The application is limited notification, meaning that many of the affected locals and the general public cannot make a submission about the proposed factory farm. Given the significance of the Buchanan Ellis Ltd proposal on the local community and the animal welfare implications, Direct Animal Action believes the application should be publicly notified and, ultimately, that Waikato Regional Council should decline the application.
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  • Keeping Cats Safe in Auckland
    Have you ever come across a cat or kitten who has died crossing the road? If you haven't, then you are fortunate and, you don't live near where I live. I have lost count of the number of cats that have lost their lives crossing roads; mostly at night and not always on busy streets. The worst time of year has been around Guy Fawkes night. Then the number of cats that die is significantly higher than the rest of the year. I decided to do some research on the subject, including how other countries handle this issue problem. Here is what I discovered. In Brisbane, Australia, in 2017, the Brisbane Council enacted the Animal Local Laws Act that requires people who have companion cats to microchip them, keep the microchip details up to date and the cat must have a collar containing contact information. As well you are required to keep your cat on your property. They do not have to be indoors all the time; they can be kept in an enclosure which could be connected to your house by a cat door or some other means. You can keep up to three companion cats without a permit; however, if you want more than a license is needed. I also looked at what they do in England to keep cats safe. They also recommend keeping cats in at night because accidents are more severe at night/in dark hours, including morning/afternoons in winter months. They also noted that it is not just road that are hazards for cats at night but that they can become injured through contact with other animals, including wild animals. There have also been problems with people in London going out at night killing cats. They have also recommended that a cat owner put a reflective or fluorescent quick-release collar on the cat as it may help them be seen. Research by Pet Insurance companies in England found that approximately 78% of all road traffic accidents involving cats happen at night. Specialists in both countries agree that you should never lock a cat out at night. Our family has always kept our cats in at night. While they were young adults, they may have tried to escape on occasions and be a little restless; however, they soon adjust. Cats are hunters; however, there is no reason why they should be allowed to roam around at night. Our cats have adopted the same sleep pattern as us of sleeping at night time. We had an old aviary that we attached to our house via a bedroom window, and that worked well. If your yard is completely fenced its possible to use a fence attachment such as the Oscillot cat fence which is a paddle system that attaches to the top of a wall, making it impossible for a cat to climb over. If you Google search you can find a variety of ideas and designs. In Auckland, there is no limit on the number of cats you can keep on your property. There is no legislation as such, only a responsible cat owner guidelines. There are bylaws protecting dogs and preventing them from becoming a public nuisance, but there are none concerning cats. Why not? In Auckland, anyone who witnesses pain or suffering of a cat needs to report it to the police and or the SPCA; otherwise, they breach the Animal Welfare Act. All well and good, however, this gives no protection to cats nor stops them from becoming a hazard. A recent Wellington study found that on average cats crossed four roads per day. While the Aminal Welfare Act contains a level of recognition that keeping cats safe means keeping the contained inside the home or on the property, there is no legal obligation to do so. The NZ Government has a Code of Welfare: Companion Cat which came into effect from October 2018. Once again it only contains recommendations such as keeping your cat indoors between dusk and dawn, keeping them indoors when fireworks are in use. The document states that some cats prefer to be out at night and will find their place under houses, in garden sheds, in dense undergrowth, etc. How is this responsible cat ownership? Are they genuinely saying that cats know that is best for them? The document has a lot of useful information on feeding, health and breeding but about from recommending that they are kept inside at night, there is nothing that protects a cat. Recommendations are one thing, but legal requirements are another. It's time to make a change, to act decisively to ensure the safety of all cats in Auckland, ensuring that they also do not become a community problem. Please sign and share the petition.
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  • Demanding Action Against Animal Experimentation
    Using animals for science does not start in a lab. It is driven by a complicated web of factors. Funding and policy decisions are a major driver of animal experimentation. A lack of transparency and openness means the public rarely knows what is going on. And our laws are often weak and selectively enforced. To tackle these problems, we are going to the very source of the use of animals in science! This petition aims to put the pressure on Parliament to start creating a world without animal testing. NZAVS has been campaigning on this topic for decades, so we will also be sharing our expertise for how to make it happen. What this petition is demanding: Better allocation of funding • Funding for retraining scientists to use non-animal-based and human-relevant methods. • Funding for infrastructure for non-animal-based and human-relevant methods. • Prioritisation of funding for research using non-animal-based and human-relevant methods. • Prioritisation of funding for research to create non-animal-based and human-relevant methods. • Funding for universities to develop courses on non-animal-based and human-relevant methods. • Deprioritisation of funding for animal-based research. Greater openness and transparency • Mandatory filming of experiments involving animals. • A registration programme for those providing animals for research. • Birth to end-of-research tracing and transparency, so it is clear for any given experiment where the animals came from and where they went after the research. • Greater transparency for existing documents, requiring their publication. • Publish all findings using animals to avoid unnecessary repetition. • Ensure private research conducted on animals is made public, to avoid unnecessary repetition. • Research conducted overseas for New Zealand companies should be subject to the same standards of openness and transparency. Stronger laws • Government bodies commit to phasing out the use of animals in science as technology permits. • Phase-out all requirements for animal testing in New Zealand law. • Legislation amended to require that non-animal-based RTT methods be used over animal-based methods (alive or dead), where they exist. • An independent body for animal welfare, such as a Crown entity or commission. • A Minister for Animals separate from the Minister for Agriculture. • A comprehensive review of the efficacy of the animal model and the potential viability of non-animal-based methods as replacements. • Involvement of the public and advocacy groups like NZAVS in decision-making. • A requirement for all Animal Ethics Committees to have an expert on non-animal-based methods. • A requirement for all Animal Ethics Committees to make applications public. • A requirement for all Animal Ethics Committees to check for non-animal-based methods that may be able to replace animals when considering an application. • The establishment and maintenance of a database of non-animal-based methods, to aid Animal Ethics Committees. • The restructure of Animal Ethics Committees to minimise conflicts of interest. Scientists involved should not have a financial interest in animal-based-research – whether via employment or ownership of a company. • Sufficient funding for enforcement to ensure these objectives are met. We believe that fulfilling these requirements will result in a new, refreshed system that will encourage scientific progress without causing harm to animals. This new system will help pave the way for a kinder and fairer Aotearoa where humans and non-human animals suffer less. Once successful, we’ll be closer to a world where human health and medical research thrives and where animals are seen as individual beings with their own right to life. You can read more about the campaign here http://nzavs.org.nz/striking-at-the-source You can learn more about how animals are used in science in NZ here: https://nzavs.org.nz/animals-in-science-nz
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  • Stop the sale of puppies at pet stores and online in Aotearoa unless it can be properly regulated
    The New Zealand Animal Welfare Act legally recognises animals as 'sentient', meaning they are now seen as able to perceive and feel things and have a right to express natural behaviour. However, this act has too many extreme intolerable loopholes, and experiences a total lack of enforcement from those in power. Legal enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) in New Zealand is down to the Ministry of Primary Industries and the SPCA. There is a lack in the numbers of those regulating the Act, and the New Zealand Government does not appear to dedicate an adequate amount of money to the SPCA, which relies almost entirely on donations and fundraising. This is not enough. No proper enforcement of the AWA means there are little to no regulations that apply to the breeding and selling of dogs and puppies in Aotearoa. This means virtually ANYONE can breed and sell a dog, no matter the life stage or stability. This puts the dogs at high risk of poor treatment, malnourishment and illness. In many cases, dogs involved in backyard breeding live in shocking conditions that no animal should ever have to endure. Puppy mills and irresponsible breeders are known to breed dogs for quantity, not quality. In order to make the money they want, they do not care to provide veterinary care to the pups that need it most, potentially leaving them with life-long health defects. It is totally unfair and wrong that behind the scenes, puppies are being bred in horrific environments so that breeders and pet-store owners can benefit economically. The only solution to this would be to stop the sale of puppies at pet stores and online unless those with higher power implement and enforce proper regulations that ensure puppies do not have to suffer just so that breeders can earn some money. Those involved in puppy mills and irresponsible breeding need to be held accountable and these unacceptable practices need to stop. We want ALL animals to be respected as the living beings they are. You can also educate yourself on the topic using the following websites... SAFE - https://safe.org.nz/our-work/animals-in-need/puppy-mills/ PETA - https://www.peta.org/issues/animal-companion-issues/pet-trade/puppy-mills/ Animal Welfare Act (SAFE) - https://safe.org.nz/our-work/animals-in-need/animal-welfare-act/ Here is a link to our OWN website we created to raise awareness: https://kellydykes.wixsite.com/puppymillsinaotearoa
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  • Incentivise NZ farmers to diversify for longevity
    Supporting our farmers to diversify into cropping and horticulture is going to be good for everyone, as well as good for the planet. What is needed are financial incentives, retraining opportunities and help in finding the right crop to grow on the land. Many of our businesses would love to be 100% Kiwi sourced, but due to being unable to buy the required plant proteins in enough quantity here in NZ, they are sourcing abroad. Kiwi farmers don't want to be left behind in the global market. The export potential for our horticulture products is huge too. We have everything to gain by transitioning to a more balanced and sustainable economy. According to an Otago University paper a wholefoods plant diet could bring carbon emissions savings of up to 42%, confer a population gain of up to 1.5 million quality-adjusted life-years, and save our health care system up to $20 billion. The nation's health and wellbeing depend on our ability to be sustainable and self-sufficient, but our farmers can only do the right thing if they are supported to do so. Government funded think tanks could help an individual farmer choose the best crop(s) for their land, work out how much land can be used for horticultural purposes and help direct a timeline for transition. Let's make this really easy. 🌱 Our Green Protein Report provides suggestions for how we can reduce emissions, detailed reasons why this needs to happen and the benefits to our society by doing so. Copies are available on request and a PDF is available for download here: http://vegansociety.org.nz/news/downloadpdf?filename=Green%20Protein%20Revolution%20Report%202020.pdf This petition is supported by 🌏 A Guide to Vegan 🌏 Better Futures Forum 🌏 Deavoll Construction Limited 🌏 Evidence Based Eating 🌏 Fitness Locker 🌏 Greenpeace NZ 🌏 Kaiaroha Vegan Deli and Eatery 🌏 Lorax Group Limited 🌏 Mylk Made 🌏 New Zealand Anti Vivisection Society 🌏 New Zealand Vegetarian Society 🌏 Plant Based NZ Health Trust 🌏 SAFE 🌏 Tanglewood Foundation 🌏 The Lentil Intervention 🌏 Ulenberg Eco-Architects Ltd 🌏 V & V 🌏 Vegan Society Aotearoa 🌏Vice Cream Limited
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  • Half Price Adoption Fees for Older Dogs
    Currently, the cost of adopting any dog from the pound is $260, which for a younger dog we do feel is appropriate but, to encourage and support members of the community to adopt older dogs, we think that a fee of $130.00 would be better suited. We want these older dogs to have a second chance at life in a new loving home, and by lowering the fee, we hope to achieve a better rehoming rate for these golden oldies. Lowering the cost to $130 won't have any direct impact on rates and will benefit the overall rehoming of older dogs and potentially lower euthanasia rates. Dog lovers of New Plymouth, please help us get this change by signing this petition.
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  • End Live Export at Port Taranaki
    Live export of farmed animals puts animals at risk, both on the sea voyage and when they arrive in their destination country. Onboard ship, animals can be thrown around in rough seas and some struggle to survive on the unnatural diet, so different from the paddocks they were raised in. At their destination, these animals can face an additional long journey by road and then an uncertain future. Port Taranaki started exporting cows at the start of 2020. In January, 4,800 cows spent 17 days at sea to their destination in China. This was followed by 3,300 cows being exported in March, again to China, and a third shipment of 4,450 animals in April. These cows are being sent to expand and strengthen the dairy industry overseas. Taranaki Regional councillors have chosen to allow these thousands of cows to be exported from Port Taranaki to places with lower animal welfare, transport and slaughter standards than New Zealand. Caring Kiwis don’t want this cruel trade to continue. [1] The export of live farmed animals for slaughter has already been banned, due to the suffering this trade inflicts on animals, but a loophole permits animals to be shipped for breeding purposes, which ultimately end in slaughter. The cows exported will likely be confined life-long in concrete factory farms and, once no longer “profitable” they will be slaughtered by means so cruel they are illegal in New Zealand. Most countries that New Zealand exports to do not require stunning prior to slaughter. This means that their throats are slit while they are still conscious. Taranaki councillors are putting profits before animal welfare. The live export trade is currently being reviewed by the Government and Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor has expressed his preference for a conditional ban on livestock exports. [2] Despite this, live export ships continue to take tens of thousands of New Zealand cows to an uncertain future. The elected officials of Taranaki Council have the power to stop all future live exports from Port Taranaki. For the sake of animal welfare, live export needs to be stopped for good. PLEASE SIGN to end the cruel export of live farmed animals from Port Taranaki. References: [1] https://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/120114883/protesters-make-stand-against-live-export-near-port-taranakis-gates [2] https://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=12275052
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  • Save NZ Dolphins
    Māui dolphins are on the brink of extinction and Hector’s dolphins are heading towards a similar fate if nothing changes. These dolphins are taonga and native to New Zealand, they’re not found anywhere else in the world. The single greatest threat to Māui and Hector’s dolphins is fishing nets. There used to be around 50,000 Hector’s but now, because of destructive fishing methods, not many more than 10,000 remain. For the critically endangered Māui, it’s even worse. In the 1970s there were around 2,000, now there are fewer than 60 left. If we don’t act now we risk losing New Zealand dolphins forever. We need to save them, and we hope you will help us! Whale and Dolphin Conservation (WDC), has been working in New Zealand behind-the-scenes for years gathering evidence and garnering political and public support. Now it’s time for all of us to raise our voices and be heard. Around 110 to 150 New Zealand dolphins die in set nets every year and a similar number in trawls. Set nets are sometimes referred to as ‘walls of death’. They hang in the water, anchored to the sea bed with weights and are stretched across the surface with floats. They are indiscriminate, catching every creature that swims into them. Trawl nets are dragged through the water by boats and, like the set nets, scoop up whatever and whoever is in their path. Right now Hector’s and Māui dolphins are protected from set nets in just 30% of their habitat and from trawl nets in less than 10%. But, here’s the great news – if we band together we can protect them and we could save the species. Are you with us? The New Zealand government is currently working on what’s called a Threat Management Plan for these dolphins – this plan outlines what the government intends to do to look after the dolphins. However the plan is woefully inadequate; the government proposals will allow at least 50 dolphins to die every year in fishing nets. This is unacceptable! See the plan here: https://www.mpi.govt.nz/dmsdocument/34971. We’re urging Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to remove these dangerous nets from the dolphins’ home. We’re calling for the New Zealand government to transition our country away from destructive fishing methods, and immediately phase out set net and trawl fishing within the dolphins’ habitat, to the 100 metre depth contour, around the whole coast of the country. The government must also consult relevant local iwi about implementing a phase out of trawling and set nets in line with the obligations of Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This is our chance to show the government how much we love these dolphins. They are taonga and deserve to survive and thrive. Sign our petition to send the Prime Minister a message and help us save them! What you can do: - Write to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, using the automatic form on our petition page - Like and share our Facebook/Instagram pages https://www.facebook.com/whalesorgnz/ https://www.instagram.com/wdc_nz/ - Post on social media about NZ dolphins and share it with us using the hashtag #SaveNZDolphins https://vimeo.com/385897570
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  • Stop the Warkworth Rodeo
    The Rodney Local Board is now the only local board in Auckland which continues to host rodeo on land under their management. The Warkworth Rodeo occurs every New Years Day at Warkworth Showgrounds. This is a decision made by the local board. Each year the controversy and public debate heightens around rodeo and its inherent animal welfare issues. Modern perspectives on the treatment of animals is causing rodeo's social license to wear thin. A 2018 report by the New Zealand Animal Law Association found rodeo to be illegal in New Zealand. Former Green Party MP Gareth Hughes tabled a private members bill that will amend the Animal Welfare Act to outlaw the rodeo activities that cause the most pain and distress to animals - specifically calf roping, steer wrestling and the use of flank straps. Every year since 2016, large protests have been held outside the Warkworth Showgrounds during the Warkworth Rodeo event. Over the 2018/19 rodeo season, three horses and one bull lost their lives in New Zealand rodeo arenas. Rodeo stands out in our country amongst events using animals, as being the only practice where animals are intentionally goaded and harassed to show behaviours they would normally only display under extreme stress. It has already been banned in parts of Europe, Australia, Brazil, Canada and the U.S, and there is a partial ban in the U.K. Animal abuse in the guise of entertainment is no longer acceptable in modern society. There is no place for rodeo in New Zealand. References: NZALA Press Release; “Rodeo is Illegal” http://nzala.org/nzala-press-release-21-march-2018/ Green Party of New Zealand Aotearoa: Let's outlaw the worst rodeo practices https://www.greens.org.nz/rodeo_animals_protection_bill Political Roundup: Should rodeos be banned in New Zealand? by Bryce Edwards https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12192026 *Your information will be shared with Direct Animal Action and ActionStation who will get in contact from time to time about this campaign and others. You are free to opt out at anytime.*
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