• Respect and value ECE teachers - stop Evolve’s exploitative contracts!
    Teachers in one of our biggest early childhood corporations are fighting a new contract that could cut their guaranteed hours and income by 50%. Please stand up and support them! In one of the worst examples of how broken New Zealand’s early childhood education system is, Evolve Education – which continued to get full government funding through the Covid-19 lockdown and got millions in wage subsidies – is asking hundreds of teachers to sign new contracts guaranteeing them just 20 hours of work a week. What’s worse, Evolve would require them to be available for a further 20 hours a week - with no compensation for this availability and no chance to earn an income elsewhere. This is unfair and unlawful Evolve owns Lollipops, Active Explorers, Learning Adventures, Pascals, Little Earth, Little Lights and Little Wonders. This contract would impact on the quality of teaching and consistency of relationships with thousands of young children. Many teachers in Evolve are refusing to sign the contracts – but we need your support. We want to stop this now before it leads to further diminishing of quality teaching and working conditions across the whole ECE sector. We are taking a stand to protect the quality of teaching and learning for children, and to protect basic working conditions for all ECE teachers. And we’re angry that in spite of increased Government funding for ECE services in May’s Budget, there’s still a pay gap of more than 24% between ECE teachers and our colleagues in kindergarten and schools. Sign this petition asking the Government to step in urgently to stop the new Evolve contracts and to change the system to protect children and teachers everywhere.
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  • 5-Point Grade Bump for VUW Students
    The impacts of COVID-19 on student health, wellbeing and academic success have been wide and varied. Many of us have lost our jobs, had our lives drastically changed, or had our mental health severely impacted as a result of greater financial uncertainty and academic pressure. We have been expected to work and thrive in conditions that are not conducive to academic success. We believe for the sake of student wellbeing, equity, and compassion, the University needs to listen to the voice of the student body and implement these changes for Trimester 1. We ask the University to consider the impact on equity between Victoria students and those of other Universities. A lack of parity between ourselves and Universities such as Otago and Auckland will impact our graduates who are seeking employment in a post-COVID world. In addition, graduates seeking to pursue further education at another University will also struggle, and their chances of receiving financial aid will suffer. VUWSA believes that a grade bump would ensure that VUW students are on equal footing with other universities who have adopted this measure. If this grade increase, alongside other equity measures – such as reduction of course workload, and 2-week extensions on assignments – are comprehensively implemented, VUW students can be assured that their academic success, as well as their health and wellbeing, are at the forefront of the university’s mind. VUWSA, alongside other student representatives, have been advocating through our internal avenues for these measures to be put in place. In many of these meetings we have been part of a small minority of students, often being ignored or shut down regarding this issue. The recent uproar of student voices around this issue have demonstrated the need for greater academic support and communication for those studying at Victoria University of Wellington. For the sake of our wellbeing, equity, and compassion, we call on the University to listen to, and act upon, the concerns of their student body. For more information check out VUWSA’s socials https://facebook/vuwsa or email kelburn@vuwsa.org.nz.
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  • An Open Letter to save Playcentre
    Playcentre is the embodiment of New Zealand's Early Childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki*. The principles of this bicultural curriculum are: - Family and community - Relationships - Holistic development - Empowerment For many families, Playcentre has supported generations of children to pursue creativity through child-led play. Another key role local Playcentres play is to enabling smooth transitions to schooling and building a sense of community. *https://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/Te-Whariki-Early-Childhood-Curriculum-ENG-Web.pdf https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2020/05/playcentres-threaten-closure-over-lack-of-government-funding.html
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  • Launch an independent inquiry into residential student accommodation
    1) Firstly, the legislation that governs residential student accommodation is insufficient, confusing, and unclear. Residential student accommodation is not covered by the Residential Tenancies Act (RTA), meaning that in the case of disputes between residents and their accommodation provider, the option of going to the Tenancy Tribunal is not available to them. Relatively, the power imbalance between a tertiary student and a student accommodation provider is much larger than that between individual tenants and landlords. Because of this, we believe that the lack of option of disputes to be heard by the Tenancy Tribunal is damaging to a students’ access to redress. The Interim Code of Practice for Pastoral Care which was introduced in 2019 also makes no real substantive change. Most of the processes specified already encompass what is going on in halls around New Zealand. This piece of legislation was designed to improve pastoral support and is not sufficient to solve the deeper issues raised here. There needs to be more specific legislation governing halls of residence to ensure the safety of students who reside there. The lack of central government regulation creates inconsistent approaches within the system of residential student accommodation. This is not only apparent in different managements of accommodation within a single tertiary provider, but also between tertiary providers. 2) Secondly, the purpose and function of residential student accommodation is unclear and inconsistent. The lack of central government legislation to support the delivery of residential student accommodation blurs the purpose of the service; is it to make the tertiary provider a profit, or is it to provide a service to students to support their education? While some tertiary providers operate their residential student accommodation services to not make a profit, other tertiary providers appear to use residential student accommodation for the purpose of money making. Often this is done in partnership with external companies, who own and/or operate the accommodation facilities. The blurred purpose or function of student accommodation is not just limited to halls of residence accommodation for high-school leavers. Irrespective of the type of residential student accommodation (i.e. catered or self-catered accommodation), the overriding purpose and function of residential student accommodation should be the same and should be clear to those using the service. The varying degrees of rental alleviation that residential students across the country received from their accommodation providers during Levels 3 and 4 of the COVID-19 lockdown has sharply highlighted how inconsistent the sector is, and raises questions around who the setup is designed to benefit. 3) Thirdly, student welfare and support within residential student accommodation is limited and inconsistent, for both staff and residents. Student welfare and pastoral care within residential student accommodation is largely delivered by Residential Assistants (RAs). RAs receive very limited remuneration (if any), often work more hours than they are paid for, and despite trying to do their best in difficult situations, receive very limited training or support. This has a flow-on effect to residents, who often do not receive the necessary support to deal with issues that arise. The type of work that RAs do can be equated to the job of a Youth Worker, but without the training and salary. Almost all of their weekly paycheck goes towards paying their accommodation fees, meaning they are left with little money at the end of it, if any at all. Furthermore, an overwhelming proportion of RAs are students themselves, and the burden of responsibility on them to support hundreds of other students through often difficult circumstances, with little to no higher support for themselves, lays bare the harrowing ordeals that these providers put them through. Incidents of sexual harassment in halls of residence, and the lack of pastoral support to students who are struggling with mental health, have demonstrated the inadequacy of ongoing training and support provided to these students placed in positions of pastoral care. Currently, there is little to no legislation protecting RAs. There are also no guidelines for other supports for residents at student accommodations, such as Student Support Coordinators (SSCs). This means that often SSCs are assigned more than one hall, and more than a thousand students. The quality of their work therefore is lowered, as they are stretched out in capacity. We call on the Education and Workforce Select Committee to conduct an independent inquiry into the purpose and operations of residential accommodation in Aotearoa, and the legislation that governs it. This inquiry should be broad in scope, examining the investment and funding models, the cost of accommodation for residents, the legal protections for residents, and support structures for residents.
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  • Universal Education Income / Te Rourou Matanui-a-Wānanga
    1) STUDENTS ARE IN POVERTY Right now, tertiary students are in poverty. The poverty that students experience is a result of years of successive governments eroding the financial support that tertiary students have access to. The COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated the economic vulnerability that students face. Students have lost the part time jobs that provided essential weekly income to cover weekly expenses like rent, power and food. Many of the jobs that students in the gig economy, tourism and hospitality disappeared overnight, too early for them to be rehired by their employer to qualify for the Wage Subsidy. The Tertiary Support Package announced by the Government on 14 April 2020 fails to address this poverty. Increasing the amount of course related costs for domestic full-time students from $1,000 to $2,000, only increases student debt, and fails to provide relief in the areas of hardship that students face, simply because this money is not able to be spent on accommodation or food costs. It is also unable to be accessed by part-time students, many of whom relied on employment, they now don’t have, to make ends meet. One student says: “...I don’t know what to do, I’m barely managing to pay my rent, I can’t pay power, I can’t afford nutritional food, I can’t even afford to buy warm clothes now that it’s getting colder. I don’t have much in the way of clothes as it is and most don’t fit me anymore. I spend more time in bed trying to keep warm because of lack of clothes and not being able to afford power.” 2) STUDENT DEBT CRISIS We have a student debt crisis in New Zealand. Student debt in New Zealand continues to climb to unprecedented levels, surpassing $16 billion this year despite the student loan scheme being introduced in 1992. For students who borrow living costs on top of course fees, in order to survive while they study, effectively double their student loan every year. The student debt crisis impacts the lives of prospective students, current students and graduates. It creates a significant barrier that deters many prospective students from accessing the opportunities post-secondary education provides, especially from lower socio-economic communities. Money should not determine one’s ability to further their education. Research shows that student debt places harmful mental pressures on current students, affecting their wellbeing, academic performance and political participation. Upon completing their tertiary studies, research highlights that graduates experience the full weight of their crippling student debt when 12.5% of the income is deducted each week, and their ability to start a family, buy their first home or travel overseas is greatly restricted for many years after graduation. Students are being buring in debt before they even get started. Students should not be forced to take on a debt sentence to access education that will benefit communities across Aotearoa. 3) EDUCATION IS THE KEY TO THE RECOVERY Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has said that “education will be key to our economic recovery”. We agree. However, the week-to-week cost of being a tertiary student is a barrier for many people wanting to begin studying for the first time or re-train, especially given that many people have lost their jobs as a result of COVID-19. This is especially the case for people with dependents, or people who are already vulnerable in our society. Donna, a full-time nursing student and solo mother is one of these students who is just scraping by. In a few years, Donna should be a qualified nurse, saving New Zealanders lives and contributing to New Zealand’s economy. She won’t achieve her dreams without additional government support. For education to be universally accessible, we must have a universally accessible system of support. SUPPORTED BY New Zealand Union of Students' Associations, Te Mana Ākonga and Tauira Pasifika PROOF THAT A UNIVERSAL EDUCATION INCOME IS ACHIEVABLE? In response to the hardship that tertiary students in Canada have experienced from COVID-19, the Canadian Government has implemented an equivalent Student Benefit of $1,250 per month for eligible students and $1,750 for students with dependents or disabilities. The tertiary education policy of New Zealand First and the Green Party both include a universal student allowance, which is the equivalent of Universal Education Income / Te Rourou Matanui-a-Wānanga. REFERENCES AND MORE INFORMATION: ‘Why increasing student debt is not a support package’ https://thespinoff.co.nz/society/16-04-2020/why-increasing-student-debt-is-not-a-support-package/ Student Benefit in Canada https://www.canada.ca/en/department-finance/news/2020/04/support-for-students-and-recent-graduates-impacted-by-covid-19.html Tertiary Support Package announced by the Government https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/covid-19-tertiary-student-support-package NZUSA Income and Expenditure Report 2017 http://www.students.org.nz/studentreport NZUSA Kei Te pai? Report 2018 http://www.students.org.nz/mentalhealth Student Loan Scheme Annual Report 2019 https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/student_loan_scheme_annual_reports/student-loan-scheme-annual-report-2019 Green Party Tertiary Education Policy https://www.greens.org.nz/tertiary_education_policy New Zealand First Tertiary Education Policy https://policy.nz/topic/Education#Tertiary%20Education ‘Crushing student debt is putting students off political action’ https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/shows/2019/09/crushing-student-debt-putting-kids-off-getting-political-author.html Student Debt and Political Participation by Sylvia Nissen https://www.bwb.co.nz/books/student-political-action https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319963211 Photo: Trinity Thompson-Browne (@trin_tb)
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  • Record our classes in response to COVID-19
    ➡️PLEASE RECORD ALL OUR CLASSES Please record all our classes, lecturers, tutorials and workshops. ➡️PLEASE MAKE ALTERNATIVE ARRANGEMENTS WHERE RECORDING IS REALLY NOT POSSIBLE We understand that not all classes can be recorded. We’re not talking about classes that are best taught in a face-to-face context, because we know that showing up to class is the best option. We are talking about laboratories, practical courses and trades classes that for reasons of practicality are not able to be recorded. Alternative arrangements could look like: 1) Rearranging the course schedule so that all physical workshops and laboratories are taught in an intensive block period once the progression of COVID-19 has slowed. 2) Putting all course materials, including readings and additional materials online. 3) Adjusting the assessments or the assessment schedule so that students do not have to be physically present in classes. This could include relaxing requirements about physical assessment hand-ins. ➡️PLEASE SUPPORT STUDENTS Class recordings alleviate inequity in our community, as they ensure that students who need to self-isolate for personal reasons are not punished for doing so. However, there are issues that need to be catered for. This includes making financial and practical support available to students and staff who do not have access to the internet or a device. It also means continuing to pay ALL staff, including those on casual contracts such as students who work as tutors, demonstrators or research assistants. If classes are cancelled, teaching staff should be supported to record classes off campus, or host classes over Zoom. We would also appreciate increased availability and monitoring of hand sanitizers, soap and clean paper towels on campus to prevent the spread of germs. We understand that there are financial limitations to the tertiary sector recording all classes. We strongly encourage you to collaborate and work together, and to support smaller institutions in your region. In a public health crisis like this, it is far better for everyone to work together. Ngā manaakitanga, New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations Te Mana Ākonga Tauira Pasifika Auckland University Students’ Association Massey University Students’ Association Albany Students’ Association Otago University Students’ Association Student Connection Weltec and Whitireia Students Association at Wintec Lincoln University Students’ Association Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association Massey University of Wellington Students’ Association Waikato Students' Union
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  • Save NZ Review of Books Pukapuka Aotearoa
    A creative culture needs critics and forums for discussion about art. NZ Review of Books reviews books published in New Zealand, it is solely dedicated to NZ books and is the only long form print review channel left in NZ. They have been running for nearly 30 years, and their editors estimate they've reviewed 15,000 NZ books in that time. Without funding this journal cannot survive. Without NZ Review of Books, writers, publishers, readers, librarians, booksellers, academics and students lose a vital part of the conversation about NZ literature. We wish to communicate our dismay at the decision Creative New Zealand have made to stop funding the journal New Zealand Review of Books Pukapuka Aotearoa. We ask that Creative New Zealand reconsider this decision. We believe that by deciding not to fund the journal Creative New Zealand is doing harm to the literary arts ecosystem in Aotearoa by removing one of the load-bearing pillars of critical discussion of books and ideas across multiple disciplines. As writers, readers, librarians, booksellers, publishers, academics, students and promoters of New Zealand writing, we rely on journals such as this to inform how we buy, lend, read and talk about our own literature. Our understanding is that Creative New Zealand’s work is to encourage, promote and support the arts in New Zealand for the benefit of all New Zealanders. We believe the decision to stop funding NZ Review of Books undermines this work. It also sends a message that open discussion, debate and critical exploration of the literary arts and the world of ideas are not valued. We sign this statement as a protest against the withdrawn funding and to ask that Creative New Zealand will reinstate it so that NZ Review of Books can continue to publish.
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  • Support Out of Hours Music and Art Schools (OOHMA) Staff for better working conditions
    Out of Hours Music/Art Classes (OOHMA) have been a longstanding part of our music and art community in New Zealand for the past fifty years. Access to funding from the MOE ensures that public music schools deliver opportunities for young children in New Zealand to have a chance at learning a musical instrument without financial burden. Emerging research confirms the importance of music and arts as key factors in a child’s education and well-being. Children are known to perform better at other subjects at school if they are learning a music instrument or participating in art, as well as improved social interaction, confidence and emotional expression. The Ministry of Education currently facilitates funding to around 150 schools in New Zealand who, through the OOHMA scheme, employ hundreds of tutors who deliver music and art tuition to thousands of school children. Many of our current OOHMA are operating in excess of their funding to cope with increasing demand and have to turn students away. More families are turning to OOHMA schools for music lessons for their children, because they cannot afford the costs of private tuition.
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  • ECE Parity
    In July 2019 the Ministry of Education agreed on behalf of the government to maintain the provision for pay parity for teachers who work in kindergartens with teachers in primary. Pay parity was first given to teachers in kindergartens in 2002 but has yet to be extended to all teachers in publicly funded teacher-led ECE services. Pay parity is a right that the Ministry of Education supports for all teachers who are employed by a kindergarten association, whether or not they are members of NZEI. The problem comes as teachers are required to meet the same qualification and certification requirements whatever ECE or school setting they work in. It is unfair that the Ministry of Education and Government support lesser pay for some teachers and its discriminatory. Teachers who don’t work in kindergartens are valued substantially less with their salary set at a minimum of $45.481 by the Ministry of Education. The same teacher in kindergarten with 6 years’ experience would earn $67,302. Effectively the only difference is their employer, yet they earn 50% more. This is about to grow. A teacher is a teacher and being paid 50% less just because you don't work in a kindergarten isn't fair. See video of the ECE teacher pay meeting and related materials and views at: Source: https://www.childforum.com/pay-parity.html
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  • Better climate education for our tamariki
    We trust that you will share our view that climate change is the single biggest and most significant (and potentially dangerous) global phenomenon that will impact on the lives not only of our children but also of their generation around that planet. It is the issue of our times and, although it comes much too late, we are relieved that at last global and local awareness of this becomes increasingly pronounced. We commend the efforts of the recent youth demonstrations to voice their concerns and appreciate any encouragement that KC has given for students to participate. It therefore seems particularly concerning (and surprising) to see how little global warming and climate change features in the education that our children are currently receiving at KC. We understand that inclusion of a stand-alone module on the issue is optional, but that for now it is not available for any age group. Furthermore, with one or two exceptions, it also seems that there is currently little opportunity taken to embrace it as a cross-curricular issue. This last point is particularly worrying, since the process of climate change could so easily be incorporated into teaching across so many subjects - whether biology, chemistry, physics, ESS, maths or indeed film-making, drama or dance! Furthermore, outside of the relatively small extra-curricula Eco-Action group , we are not aware of any initiatives being taken by the college institutionally to promote behaviour or initiatives to support reductions in carbon-emissions – whether around car-pooling, encouraging more cyclists, carbon-sequestration schemes, renewable energy installations, or indeed on how to undertake effective lobbying and advocacy. We acknowledge and respect that the teaching body is under strong parent-led (and market-led) pressures to focus on maximising examination success and that there is little room to introduce much more to what is already a very full and demanding work load for teachers. We are also informed (although again with surprise) that the Ministry of Education is not currently supplying KC with the necessary relevant and updated teaching guides and educational materials that could be used either for stand alone climate change modules or for helping the subject be introduced as a cross-cutting theme across all subjects. However, we do feel that these constraints could – and should - be overcome.
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  • Fund and Implement Mental Health Skills Training Programmes in all NZ Schools
    “New Zealand is the undisputed champion at rugby, at sailing and at rowing. We, as a nation, are also champions at letting our young people die.” - https://educationcentral.co.nz/losing-the-battle-the-desperate-need-for-more-mental-health-funding-in-schools/ Mental health problems affect 1 in 5 people in their lifetime. 688 people lost their lives to suicide in New Zealand in 2018 and a survey by the Council for Education Research shows 62 per cent of principals are struggling to get help for students with mental health issues - https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/mike-hosking-breakfast/audio/schools-struggling-to-meet-students-mental-health-needs/ A study by the Government's chief science adviser Sir Peter Gluckman finds youth suicide is caused more by modern social pressures than mental illness, https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/youth-suicide-caused-more-modern-social-pressures-than-mental-illness-study-finds?platform=hootsuite We suggest the Pause, Breathe, Smile programme as it is designed in New Zealand and has proven results from three research studies led by both University of Auckland and AUT University. Results showed that participation in Pause, Breathe, Smile: - Increases calmness - Improves focus and attention - Enhances self-awareness - Helps develop conflict resolution skills and positive relationships - Reduces stress for teachers - Leads to statistically significant increases in wellbeing. We believe that if teachers are able to to create a calm and focused environment which PBS encourages, students will then be able to better progress their learning which will boost their confidence and enjoyment at school. Nigel Latta, New Zealand Psychologist and supporter of the Pause, Breathe Smile Programme said "Isn’t it time we taught every child in this country, in every part of this country, how to deal with stress and anxiety? How to manage their feelings and emotions? Isn’t it time we taught them fundamentally important, and highly effective skills, for living a less stressful, happier life?" - For information regarding the connection of the programme to the school curriculum visit: https://mindfulnesseducation.nz/pbs-the-new-zealand-curriculum/ Our mission is to enable all New Zealand youth to have access to the skills required to maintain overall wellbeing and improve mental health. As it is compulsory for our youth to attend school, we believe that if teachers are qualified to teach these skills we can boost the wellbeing of our nation's young people, ensuring they’re equipped with quality mental health skills to thrive and not just survive the mental health struggles that our society faces today. Moreover, the teachers will be learning these skills too and develop the tools to cope with the demanding and stressful nature of being a school teacher. This will lead to a more productive nation with more people able to work and contribute to our economy as well as reduce the enormous pressure on our health system. Together we can build a youth with a strong mental backbone. This is so important because as Nelson Mandela once said "the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow." Where can I get support and help? Below is a list of some of the services available which offer support, information and help. Lifeline 24/7 – 0800 543 354 Kidsline (aimed at children up to 18 years of age, available 24/7) – 0800 54 37 54 Depression Helpline 24/7 - 0800 111 757 Healthline - 0800 611 116 Samaritans - 0800 726 666 (for callers from the Lower North Island, Christchurch and West Coast) or 0800 211 211 / (04) 473 9739 (for callers from all other regions) Youthline - 0800 376 633, free text 234 or email talk@youthline.co.nz What's Up (for 5-18 year olds; 1 pm to 11 pm) - 0800 942 8787 www.depression.org.nz - includes The Journal online help service www.thelowdown.co.nz - visit the website, email team@thelowdown.co.nz or free text 5626 (emails and text messages will be responded to between 12 noon and 12 midnight).
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  • Enable full time nature based early childhood education in NZ - Petition has been presented
    Children today are less active and more sedentary than previous generations having limited opportunities to spend regular time in nature. With parent’s busy lives and our children spending more time in childcare centres than ever before, they do not get to experience the same nature-based play opportunities that their parents and grandparents experienced. This is having a detrimental effect on our children. We are seeing children becoming weaker, less resilient and less imaginative. Younger and younger they are suffering from mental health problems, obesity, oral language developmental problems, anxiety and stress. There is a movement happening in New Zealand right now as parents and educators recognise the benefits that nature has to offer and visibly see the incredible changes it makes in the lives of their tamariki. There are so many benefits [1] [2] that nature play can offer including: • Reducing stress • Improving social relations • Enhanced cognitive abilities • It supports creativity and problem solving • Increased physical activity, sensory and motor development • Improved academic performance including oral language, decision making and negotiation skills. A HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT In the early years of life, play, particularly free, unstructured and outdoors is essential for healthy brain development, socio-emotional development and healthy musculoskeletal and sensory systems. It is far more important than direct instruction. Nature can not only heal our children it can build confidence, resilience and is beneficial for their mana atua and overall kotahitanga. IMPORTANCE OF RISKY PLAY It provides them with age appropriate risky play opportunities which allow children to understand their own limitations, develop their problem-solving skills and teaches them to overcome fears and anxieties. CREATING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Creating a play experience outside on a regular basis will not only educate our children about where their curiosity may take them, it also feeds a deeper connection to our natural environment. Instilling these connections in this new generation is of most importance to our Kaitiakitanga and environmental sustainability. FOR THE FUTURE OF OUR TAMARIKI In other parts of the world, full time nature education programmes are well established in ECE. These countries include Sweden, Holland, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, England, Scotland, Wales, America and Australia. They are often called forest kindergartens. Please sign this petition for our children and grandchildren to help give them the option of full time nature-based education in New Zealand. The benefits are not just immediate but long term and with the early years being a critical time for brain development, supported nature-based play is a must for New Zealand. [1] http://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/getting-involved/students-and-teachers/benefits-of-connecting-children-with-nature.pdf [2] https://naturalearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Benefits-of-Connecting-Children-with-Nature_InfoSheet.pdf PETITION UPDATE 5th July 2019 On Tuesday 25th June at 1pm a group of over 50 nature educators and petition supports including tamariki congregated on the steps of parliament to present the petition to MP's. Nikki Kaye received the petition alongside Ruth Dyson, Chloe Swarbrick, Nicola Willis, Harete Hipango, Ron Mark, Dan Bidois, The Deputy Prime Minster Winston Peters and more! It was such a special day and made evermore vibrant with the tamariki being present. Celia Hogan as the petition organiser introduced the petition and spoke on behalf of all those who signed and supported it, then 8 year old Kannika Smith gave a speech talking about her time as a preschooler in a nature excursion programme and how much she would love to see this available for all children in New Zealand. Kannika, supported by all the tamariki presented Nikki Kaye with a beautiful kete which contained the petition. Nikki Kaye accepted it on behalf of National, Labour, Green, New Zealand First and the Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters. MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE PETITION 2019: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/nearly-6000-signature-strong-petition-urging-government-allow-outdoor-bush-kindies-presented-parliament?fbclid=IwAR2j67jE_6-SzpJq77U4Bny10_5QkyhmWpUVLwLKP-qH4N7horgJRR_KPXE https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/petition-asking-rule-change-allow-bush-kindies-breaks-5000-mark https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/113748799/red-zone-could-be-home-to-christchurchs-first-bush-kindy-if-parliament-backs-petition?fbclid=IwAR319cXLkojFcyjPXmHQyeTb9FX5SGctLsXPW3EJSUImxviB498ddIcHGLY https://embed.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons/audio/2018701241/celia-hogan-bush-kindergarten-petition-presented-to-parliament https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/petition-calls-kids-have-access-full-time-nature-based-childcare?fbclid=IwAR3n0-h3A-fGzDBMtXYqs_dU-5xhhaDrV67MJgxNdiTCnZIgj7w7uAfZOtk MEDIA COVERAGE FROM 2018: News Paper Article: https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/105632188/wading-through-red-tape-and-cotton-wool-to-enable-naturebased-kindergartens TV Interiew - The Project: https://www.facebook.com/TheProjectNZ/videos/1295811877222129 Radio Interview with Jesse Muligan: https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/afternoons/audio/2018657544/bush-kindergartens-changing-the-way-kids-play Radio Interview with Mike Hosking: http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/mike-hosking-breakfast/audio/celia-hogan-many-parents-want-outdoor-kindys/
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