• Ask the Govt to define Islamophobia & show solidarity with Muslims
    Defining Islamophobia is the only way to fight it! Right now, there is no definition of what constitutes as Islamophobia. Defining Islamophobia will not only help challenge it but build a common understanding of its cause and consequences, and express solidarity with your Muslim communities. Why hold media to account? An Islamophobic headline plastered over our national newspapers has far greater implication than individual comments on social media. Yet, while individuals can be punished for up to 14 years for hate speech, powerful media companies remain unaccountable. Daily Islamophobic statements in the media continue unchecked for bias because there are no consequences. Clearly, the media believes a public platform does not come with social responsibility. Earlier this week Media company NZME removed some of its online content in the wake of Christchurch shootings because it was "upsetting people" [1] As one user put it “It's not enough to quietly remove your complicity in the racism and hate (and lies) that created this” You’d be forgiven for thinking there is no bias in our media, however in 2017 New Zealand media featured 14,349 stories that included the word Islam - nearly 13,000 of those stories mentioned either terrorism or Islamic Jihad [2] A new study of six newspapers in Australia found 2,891 negative stories about Islam and Muslims in a single 12 months [2017] [3] Per day this represents 8 negative stories! Headlines in Britain “Muslims Silent on Terror,” [later refuted by UK officials], “Muslims Tell British: Go to Hell,”, “Muslim Schools Ban Our Culture,” are commonplace [3]. Often, they are retracted when challenged for bias. But, the damage is already done! Is it any wonder the Christchurch mosque terrorist came to view the world as locked in a violent battle against Muslims he deemed “invaders,”? We are told Muslims are violent and Islam preaches violence. How did Muslims react in the aftermath of Christchurch? So, why does the media keep pushing beliefs and teachings antithetical to Islam. Do we continue to give free reign to our news media which is intent on making us more violent. What is the price of lives lost in Christchurch. We’ve all looked the other way in the face of racism, now is the time to do something different. Aaliya, Safia, Marian, Leslie References 1) https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/christchurch-shooting/111376467/upset-following-christchurch-shootings-prompts-nzme-to-take-some-content-offline 2) https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/mediawatch/audio/2018687496/mediawatch-midweek-20-march-2019 3) https://www.trtworld.com/opinion/rupert-murdoch-s-islamophobic-media-empire-25079
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    Created by Aaliya, Safia Leslie, Marian
  • Public Broadcasting of Azan for Jummah Prayer
    Azan is a call to prayer which in many Muslim countries is broadcast publicly to let the community know it is time for prayer. For many Muslims, this call is familiar and very close to home. This act of support and solidarity for our fellow Muslims is beyond powerful and will bring joyful and comforting tears to the eyes of many in our nation. Immense solidarity will be portrayed through this act. This will no doubt condemn any further acts of such kind in the future and, most importantly, will reinstate the welcome Muslims and people of all backgrounds have had here in Aotearoa. This country has given most people, including Muslims and migrants, everything they would never have had in their country of origin. It has given us peace, hope, tranquillity and, most of all, the opportunity to lead a fulfilled life with freedom to express religious, cultural, spiritual and personal beliefs. However, today, these privileges were jeopardised. This was not “an act of unprecedented violence”, instead, it was a violent act of unprecedented racism and Islamophobia. By simply stating it as an act of violence does not do it justice. Muslims and migrants all over New Zealand face discrimination and racism every day. Yesterday’s overwhelming tragedy is an extreme act of that very racism and Islamophobia. In saying that, the support the Islamic community has received from everyone of all backgrounds is incredible, although, misguided. This is New Zealand. This exists in our soil. This may not be us individually, but, this mindset walks and lives among us. It is destructive to deny and refuse any association to this kind of behaviour as it does not address the root causes of the recent act of terrorism. Only when we accept there is such thing as hate in our country will we be able to move forward. These are not the values we hold as a nation, but this is us. The work that has been done by groups and individuals in support of the victims, the victims’ families and others affected by such hate is heart-warming and uplifting. One thing we can do is show the world and the country that this mindset is unwelcome. Standing up for those on the receiving end of such terrorism is more powerful than the victims standing up for themselves. It displays an image of strength through unity, peace through togetherness and alliance between members of society.
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    Created by Atif Hakim Picture
  • Limit aircraft noise and pollution over Wattle Downs and South Auckland
    Over the past few years, the neighbourhoods of Wattle Downs, Weymouth, Clendon, Manurewa and Wiri have been subjected to increased aircraft activity creating excessive noise and air pollution both night and day as a result of the Smart Path Trials. There is an endless onslaught of low flying aircraft which has serious impacts on the health and wellbeing of those on the ground close to airports and flight paths. Recently a noise monitor was installed in Wattle Downs. The report over the Winter months indicated that of the average 57 flights per day excessive noise events occurred in 20 flights each day. This is set to increase over summer. We strongly believe that the Airport Authority has conducted unfair and unjust practices towards the residents of Wattle Downs in particular and South Auckland in general over the Smart Path Trials which were conducted over a two year period without notification to those affected. The Southern Flight path and the two Northern Paths use satellite technology which condenses traffic in and out of airports over concentrated areas. The Trials were conducted differently and had discriminatory results. The two northern flight paths were monitored for noise prior to, during and following the trials ● The number of flights were limited, 5 flights to 10 flights per day ● There was a ban on flights during 10pm at night and 7am in the morning ● The communities had press coverage, consultation and a review process ● The negative feedback from residents resulted in the proposed number of flights, (30 per day) being cancelled and landing procedures amended to mitigate noise complaints. ● Total flights for both flight paths for the trial period was 1704 The southern flight path had no noise monitoring prior to during or after the trials, and ● There was no limit on the number of flights over the south ● There was no night time bans on flights, flights being permitted 24 hours a day ● There was no public awareness about these trials and noise complaints dismissed ● There was no consultation process with residents and thus no reviews of the trials ● Total number of flights over trial period: 10,118 The following actions are required: 1. Investigate the process that Auckland Airport Authority followed in allocating flight paths to and from Auckland Airports 2. Justly distribute aircraft noise and air pollution over the entire Auckland area 3. Ban ALL night time flights over residential areas not just those from affluent Auckland areas 4. Implement ALL known noise mitigation tools and strategies to alleviate unbearable noise and air pollution burdens 5. Review all procedures including redress for affected communities 6. Ensure that strong protections for communities and citizens near airports are built into Parliamentary Bills 7. Require that the Aviation Authorities inform and enter into dialogue with any potentially impacted communities of any changes in flight paths or procedures that would impact them. 8. Set up a Health and Medical committee to collate all available scientific information on this public health issue and report it's findings 9. Reassign the responsibility for environmental impact and monitoring and enforcement of acceptable noise and air quality levels to the New Zealand Environmental Protection Agency rather than the New Zealand Aviation Administration which has an inherent conflict of interest https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/69290065/aircraft-noise-a-headache-for-residents https://corporate.aucklandairport.co.nz ANCCG https://corporate.aucklandairport.co.nz/corporate-responsibility/managing-aircraft-noise/being-a-good-neighbour/aircraft-noise-community-consultative-group
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    Created by Jackie Ryan
  • Safe parking for the staff of Middlemore Hospital
    The cars of Middlemore Hospital staff are frequently broken into, causing distress and unexpected costs for the staff. This happens in the staff parking lots which are too easily accessible for people from outside the hospital. Windows are smashed, things are stolen, steering wheels are broken, ignitions damaged. The fact that this mostly happens at night is very stressful for the staff who finish a shift at midnight and then often cannot drive themselves home because their cars have been damaged. There is also not enough parking for all the staff at the hospital.
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    Created by Anna Majavu
  • Put children and whānau wellbeing at the heart of welfare
    No one in Aotearoa New Zealand should be forced to live in poverty. In good times and in hard times, we should all have the dignity and security of a roof over our head, healthy kai on the table and the essential things we need. A stable whare (house) is the foundation for a good life. None of us can go about our lives, raise a family, go to work or stay healthy without a warm, dry and safe place to call home. But right now, due to the way in which successive governments have run down the welfare system, and taken a hands-off approach to the housing market, New Zealand’s homes are some of the least affordable in the industrial world. Families are having to choose between rent and food. When people lose their job, get sick or end a relationship and then can’t keep a roof over their heads, we are seeing the failures of an unkind, unjust and unbalanced economic system. When corporations are taking in record profits, but there hasn’t been a real increase in income support for a generation, and more and more people can’t make ends meet, our society is out of balance. These statistics should both astound and compel us into action: - The wealthiest 20 percent of people in New Zealand hoard 70 percent of the wealth, while the poorest 40 percent have just three percent. - Two New Zealand billionaires have more combined wealth than the poorest 30 percent of people in this country. - Over 50 percent of all people in New Zealand who receive an Accommodation Supplement to pay for their housing needs are spending more than half their incomes on housing, while four out of every five renters cannot afford to pay their rent comfortably. - The median Pākehā has $114,000 of wealth. The median Māori has $23,000. That’s a gap of $91,000. The median Pasifika person has even less at $12,000. - Between 2004 and 2010 the wealth of the richest one percent - about 34,000 people - increased from $94billion to $147billion; that’s $4,323,529 per person. Meanwhile the poorest 10 percent of people saw their net debt increase from $5.7billion to $7.4billion. CEO pay is increasing at almost five times the rate of the average worker. - 27 percent of New Zealand’s children live in poverty, where poverty is defined as having less than 60 percent of the national median household income (after housing costs), while six percent (70,000) of all children live in severe hardship. - There are now at least 41,000 homeless New Zealanders, more than half of whom are younger than 25. There is too much wealth in too few hands while everyday New Zealanders struggle to make ends meet and the cost of living continues to soar. We need government intervention to end the poverty trap and rebalance our economy. We need government intervention to ensure that everyone one in this country has enough pūtea (income) to live with dignity and participate fully in the community. If we are to fulfil the Coalition Government’s goal for Aotearoa to be the best place in the world to be a child, then all parents, whānau and caregivers must have a liveable income. A hands-on government can fix our broken economic system. A hands-on government can change the rules to make our economy fair, kind and just. A competent and caring government can ensure that every child and whānau flourishes. Read more: www.welfareforwellbeing.org
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    Created by Team ActionStation Picture
  • Open letter to Waikato Regional Council to pay contractors a living wage
    A Living Wage is the income necessary to provide workers and their families with the basic necessities of life. The Living Wage enables workers to live with dignity and to participate as active citizens in society. Research has found a Living Wage enables employees to be able to spend more time with their families, feel valued, be less stressed and consequently happier and more motivated in their workplaces. Furthermore, treatment of employees is integral to business success. A report undertaken in the UK found implementation of a living wage decreases staff turnover and increases productivity. Reference: Brown, Newman & Blair, (2014) "The Difference a Living Wage makes" Paper to the Population Health Congress
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    Created by Living Wage Waikato Picture
  • Keep Postal Services in Naenae
    The recent complete withdrawal of the postal services has upset our community - the residents and the surrounding small businesses and shops. For Naenae residents, it now means that they have to travel out of the suburb for NZ Postal Services, such as posting, courier pick-ups / drop-offs, bill payments, vehicle registrations, etc. The closest postal agency now is in Avalon. For older persons, and others such as those without access to a car, this is a $9-$10 taxi trip one-way. For those using the bus system, the NZ Post Office in Queensgate Mall is the most accessible (but not the nearest) Post Shop at a cost of $4 one-way. Naenae is one of the most socio-economically deprived suburbs in the country, with a significant proportion of the residents on limited fixed incomes, many with no or limited access to vehicles and the internet (i.e., internet banking). With the removal of the postal services, many Naenae residents end up spending money they can't afford to get to a Post Shop in order to complete necessary everyday household business transactions so they can keep their lights on, their homes warm and their telephones working. Many of our residents also use the postal service to send and receive letters, postcards, care parcels and gifts to (grand)children, family, and friends. Now, there is an additional cost and inconvenience to do so. Removing the postal services from Naenae represents an unreasonable imposition of costs and time for a service which was reasonably in demand from the 8,200 Naenae residents. The removal of the postal services from Naenae has also had a noticeable negative affect on the small businesses and retailers in the Naenae shopping area. They are losing out on business from people who would shop and/or get their prescriptions filled before of after using the postal services. Retailers have commented on the noticeable drop in people and in business transactions since the postal services left Naenae. We want Naenae to be a strong, vibrant community where people are able to access essential services in their community. We want to support our small businesses and retailers in our town centre / shopping area. Keeping the postal services in Naenae plays an important part in doing this. Note: We understand one of the reasons why NZ Post removed all postal services was because they didn't have another shop to partner with. We have at least 3 businesses in the shopping area who put their hand up when the removal of the postal services was announced and who are still interested in set up postal services in their shops. This petition was written by Lillian Pak and Chris Norton, on behalf of Team Naenae Trust, in response to numerous queries and concerns expressed to Team Naenae Trust both individually and at the Trust's community meetings.
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    Created by Lillian Pak
  • Help end period poverty - subsidise menstrual cups
    We are three young women (Kacey, Chloe, and Heleana) running a campaign called Menstrual Mana. The important social issue we are working on is making menstrual cups more affordable and accessible to the vulnerable - in particular, making menstrual cups free for girls who attend decile 3 or lower schools. Menstrual Cups are a new product which were developed to help diminish the high pollution rates caused through other menstrual products such as pads and tampons. “The average woman uses roughly 11,000 tampons in her lifetime. The time it takes for a tampon or pad to degrade in a landfill is centuries longer than the lifespan of the woman who used it, particularly when wrapped in a plastic wrapper or bag. In addition, the process of manufacturing these products – turning wood pulp into soft, cotton-like fibres – is both resource- and chemical-intensive” (Rosie Spinks 2015, The Guardian). However, even though menstrual cups reduce pollution, they’re also triple in price of a box of tampons/pads. The price of menstrual cups is an issue for many women in New Zealand, especially women who are still at school and don’t receive an ongoing income. Sign this petition to show support towards Menstrual Mana's hope in making Menstrual Cups free for women who are in decile 3 or lower schools. Period poverty 'a human rights issue' - https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/period-poverty-human-rights-issue-says-green-mp-golriz-ghahraman-some-girls-miss-school?auto=5825163987001
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    Created by Heleana McNaught
  • Call to Parliament for improved access to the residential care subsidy
    My name is Grace Taylor. I am the daughter of a mother suffering from Alzheimer's / Early Onset Dementia. Mum is 1 of the 60,000 people in New Zealand currently affected by this disease. A statistic set to triple in New Zealand by 2050.[1] In March 2018, my mother’s health deteriorated and as a result, medical professionals advised my brother (who lives in Australia) and I that our mum required full time care by skilled professionals. We made the heartbreaking decision to admit our mother into a residential care home. A bigger hit came in May 2018, when my mother fell victim to unfair legislation that is crippling our family to financially provide for the quality care that my mother so rightly deserves. Two months after mum's condition required her to be admitted into full time care, mum’s application to the Ministry of Social Development for the residential care home subsidy was denied, in full and stood down to reapply again for another 4 years. This is due to the strict, blanket criteria of the eligibility for this subsidy. More specifically the criteria around the income and asset testing of applicants. Anyone’s loved ones could require residential care for many health reasons. As of 30 June 2018 there were 31,566 people aged 65+ in long term aged residential care. In addition there were 550 in respite care, for a total of 32,116. There are a further 1271 “Other residents” in living in aged care facilities but who don’t qualify for aged residential care ie “people fully funded by ACC or people with long-term conditions who are not assessed for aged residential care”.[2] Papers released under the Official Information Act show that each year around 1000 people with assets or income over the threshold receive no government help to pay weekly residential care costs that can reach over $1000.[3] "The asset base that you have to fall below to qualify for the subsidy is, I would argue, really quite low. We get a lot of people saying to us, look I just didn't know that dementia would be this expensive. It really costs people a lot of money." - Paul Sullivan, Chief Executive Dementia NZ I went public with my mother’s story on social media in May 2018. Within 24 hours - 10 NZ families contacted me directly with very similar stories for their loved ones with that have required residential care home to care for their loved ones. And there are so many more. With the denial of her residential care home subsidy due to the asset and gifting threshold set by the Ministry of Social Development, my mother has been stood down for 4 years to receive any financial support for her care home fees. Leaving my brother and I to pay her $4900 monthly fees, for the next 4 years. I am a single mother, I work full time, have a mortagage, and the only benefit I receive from the government is the OSCAR subsidy for my son’s after school care. Since March 2018 I have been had to take out personal loans, and rely on contributions of my brother, mum’s minimal pension, and my salary to pay $890 a fortnight for our family home mortgage, and $4960 a month for mums care home fee. As of August 2018, I can no longer maintain these costs. As a result we have been forced into a decision to sell our family home, of 40 years, in order to fund mums care over the next 4 years. A home that was the only place that was familiar and safe to my mother as her dementia took hold, a home I have been raising my son, a home that was my mother’s only material asset, a home that my mother worked 3 jobs to own and provide as security for her children. This is now being taken from us. My mother has never received a benefit from the government and has worked 2 sometimes 3 jobs for over 40 years to provide for us. I have followed all the formal avenues and processes with my local MP, Ministry of Social Development and Ministry of Health. Having received responses from each minister directly it became very clear that what needs to be addressed is the legislation around the residential care home subsidy. This is my call, on behalf of many voices, for that action. Please raise your voice with me. Fa'afetai tele lava. To read more about the detailed bigger picture of my family's story please visit: https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/363396/families-of-dementia-sufferers-face-huge-bills Tagata Pasifika feature story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27r-EA0JSJY&t=7s Here is my open letter to NZ in response to our situtation. https://www.facebook.com/grace.taylor.5437923/videos/1627972693991555/ References 1. As stated in the report Economic Impact of Dementia (2016) by Deloitte & Alzheimer's New Zealand 2. New Zealand Aged Care Association 3. Radio New Zealand, 6th August 2018
    4,207 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Teuila Taylor Picture
  • Give me room - a campaign for a safe passing rule
    Close passing is intimidating, dangerous, and in the worst cases life threatening for people on bikes and foot. The NZ Road Code recommends 1.5m: “Give cyclists plenty of room when passing them. Ideally, allow at least 1.5 metres between you and the cyclist”, but this lacks the force of law. Bike lanes are great but they don't go everywhere. People on bikes need the protection of the law. More at https://can.org.nz/givemeroom Safe Passing Rule FAQ at http://cyclingchristchurch.co.nz/2015/11/13/mythbusting-what-a-safe-passing-rule-means/
    2,598 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Patrick Morgan, Cycling Action Network
  • Divest the NZ DHBs of the responsibility of Nursing 'safe staffing' agreement
    The DHBs have been asked by the Nurses Union NZNO for more money for more nursing staff to safely staff their (the DHB) workplaces (DHB workplaces are public hospitals), for 14 years, and each year since 2004, the DHBs have failed to provide money for more nursing staff to make their workplaces safe for the patients and the nursing staff. When DHB workplaces are unsafely staffed the patients do not receive the care that they require. Essential monitoring of a deteriorating patient gets missed by the nurse because they have too many patients to safely care for, pain medication gets missed, nurses become exhausted and fail to take their meal breaks which compounds an already unsafe situation, and sentinel events (near misses, and serious injury and death to patients due to unsafe staffing) start to occur. However as the DHB hasn't committed to putting Care Capacity Demand Management into place which is NZNO Safe Staffing request, as advocated for by NZNO, the instances of Unsafe Staffing in DHB workplaces are neither recorded nor audited. So NZNO, NZNO Nursing members, DHBs, or the Safe Staffing Healthy Workplaces Unit have no idea how many instances of care rationing have lead to sentinel events for patients being cared for in DHB workplaces. The DHBs have a conflict of interest and at NZNO nurse wage negotiation times, pit one essential requirement of nurses demanding a pay rise versus the nurses essential requirement for more staffing to safely care for our patients. The District Health Boards honour neither requirement, because it is in the District Health Board's interest to save money. This is a conflict of interest and it makes a mockery of the District Health Board acting as a "Good Faith" bargaining partner. This is the possibility of corruption in a government department, and is not acting in “Good Faith” as an employer. We ask that the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, and the New Zealand Nurses Organisation divest all District Health Boards from New Zealand Nursing Organisations 'safe staffing' agreement. Make the 'safe staffing' agreement between New Zealand Nurses Organisation, Ministry Of Health, and Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment. The DHB needs to bargain in good faith on the wages and pay increases for its employees. The DHB could then be held accountable to the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment regarding honouring the government mandate of providing a safe DHB workplace for the staff and patients. Ensure that care capacity demand management requirements are provided for and achieved in the DHB workplace, and are advised upon and enforced by NZNO. Funding for Safe Staffing would be the only responsibility of the Ministry of Health to avoid future conflicts of interest, and regulated by the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, and be audited, administered, enforced and staffed by NZNO in the DHB workplace every shift. It is important that an effective government department such as the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, which is bound by the Health and Safety Act 2015, can regulate, administer and enforce laws that protect the patients and staff who work in DHB workplaces. Nursing and Allied Health Staff work in DHB workplaces and provide care for Patients, in the workplace that the DHB provides. The DHB is obliged under the Health and Safety Act 2015 to provide all requirements in their workplaces, to meet Health and Safety standards which include Safe Staffing, specific nurse to patient ratios depending on acuity/comorbidity that are enforced by New Zealand Nurses Organisation 24/7 on site staff who monitor, record, audit, communicate and find staff for unsafely staffed DHB workplaces. NZNO would advise, regulate, enforce, administer and provide staff to monitor DHB workplaces and Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment compliance with safe staffing. There would always be a NZNO staff member available within DHB workplaces 24/7 to monitor compliance of the DHB workplace's nurse to patient ratios and reporting, recording, and enabling provision of one or multiple nursing staff members to work should that be required. Having a stronger and more responsive government Ministry in place will make accountability for safer staffing greater, will minimise care rationing by nurses to patients, and will decrease length of hospital stay for patients, it will provide for better care to the patient and more effective nursing care within a shorter time frame, and will diminish the incidence of serious sentinel events (serious and fatal harm caused to patients due to unsafely staffed DHB workplaces). It will also allow the DHB to act as a bargaining employer of Good Faith, and will restore some transparency, integrity and accountability to the DHB's reputation to deliver upon wage negotiation pay rises for Nursing staff. http://nursingnzme2.wpengine.com/right-staffing-happier-staff-finds-ccdm-research/ http://nursingreview.co.nz/right-nurse-right-place-and-right-time/ http://nursingreview.co.nz/safe-staffing-and-nursing-strikes-a-brief-history/ https://www.nzno.org.nz/get_involved/campaigns/care_point/what_is_ccdm https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/opinion/2018/07/duncan-garner-irony-nurses-finally-get-safe-staffing-levels-during-strike.html
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    Created by Anna Dobson Picture
  • Extend the Income-Related Rent Subsidy to all Wellington City Council Tenants.
    Dear Hon Phil Twyford, Wellington City Council is landlord to in excess of 2500 social housing units within Wellington. Rental rates are based on 70% of market rent , and rents are reviewed and increased annually by approximately 3-5%. This year, however, City Housing tenants have been hit hard with one of the largest rent increases in recent years — double that of last years. Contrary to public belief, Wellington City Council is an expensive landlord and its social housing rentals are no longer an affordable option for those who need it most. An external operational review of the council's social housing unit, recently released to media under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act, reveals that "two-thirds of tenants are paying well over 35 per cent of their income on rent." Now, more than ever, Wellington City Housing tenants need "a fairer and more equitable rental scheme." It is a matter of urgency that council tenants can access the same Income-Related Rent Subsidy that is automatically applied to all Housing New Zealand tenants. Despite Wellington City Council voting to pursue the Government to help ease the burden on its low-income tenants by extending the rent subsidy, the Government has responded by saying it favours this subsidy, but "not this term." Why not? https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/104904348/wellington-city-asks-government-for-rent-subsidies-and-votes-to-review-social-housing-rents This government claims to care about New Zealand's most financially and materially disadvantaged people. It also claims to be making affordable housing for those who are most in need a priority. By failing to extend the Income-Related Rent Subsidy to all social housing tenants, while rent rates continue to rise annually, the Government is putting low-income tenants at considerable risk of being excluded from accessing their most basic human right to a roof over their head. Wellington City Council tenants are are an ethnically and socially diverse group of residents . Many are elderly, refugees and migrants, live with disabilities and/or suffer from long term chronic health problems. Some have overcome homelessness, domestic violence, and have first hand experience of discrimination and exclusion.  The Wellington City Council's Social Housing Service Policy (last updated in 2010) states: - Over 80% of the Council's tenants are Work and Income New Zealand beneficiaries. "The largest priority group of city housing customers — a group that comprises 38% status — are categorized as “multiple disadvantaged”. https://wellington.govt.nz/~/media/your-council/plans-policies-and-bylaws/plans-and-policies/a-to-z/housingsocial/files/housing.pdf?la=en Please sign and share this petition.
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    Created by K W
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