• Reduce the nicotine in cigarettes
    Smoking is one of the biggest public health issues in New Zealand, and every year nearly 5,000 people die from smoking-related illnesses in Aotearoa (1). As the leading cause of preventable death and disease in New Zealand, smoking increases an individual’s risk of developing 11 different kinds of cancers, as well as increasing the risk of strokes and heart disease (2). Long-term smokers will die on average 10 to 15 years earlier than non-smokers and the impact of second-hand smoke continues to be a contributing factor to the high rates of asthma and respiratory illness in our tamariki (3, 4). Smoking has a huge cost for our health system,for our whānau and for our communities. Māori and Pacific communities have consistently lower health outcomes than the rest of the population, and smoking is no exception. Smoking disproportionately affects Māori and Pasifika, with 31% of Māori adults and 20% of Pasifika adults smoking daily, versus 13% in the rest of the population (5). If this government is truly committed to addressing health inequalities in Aotearoa, then reducing the addictiveness of cigarettes is an important place to start. Evidence shows that an overwhelming majority of smokers want to quit (6). Reducing nicotine to very low levels will make it easier for those who want to stop smoking to kick the habit, saving money and improving their health. We believe that reducing the nicotine in cigarettes is the bold action required to combat this significant public health issue. Please sign the petition to tell the government there's no more time to waste! Reducing the nicotine in cigarettes will save lives. This petition is part of Reduce the Nicotine, a broader campaign to reduce the nicotine in cigarettes in Aotearoa - get involved and find out more at: http://reducethenicotine.co.nz/. References: 1) Ministry of Health. (2004). Looking upstream: Causes of death cross-classified by risk and condition, New Zealand 1997. Wellington: Ministry of Health. 2) Laugesen, M. (2000). Tobacco statistics 2000. Wellington: Cancer Society of New Zealand; Vineis, P., Alavanja, M., Buffler, P., Fontham, E., Franceschi, S., Gao, Y.T., et al. (2004). Tobacco and cancer: Recent epidemiological evidence. Journal of National Cancer Institute, 96: 99-106; Ministry of Health. (2005). Tobacco facts 2005. Wellington: Ministry of Health; Quit Victoria. (n.d.). 3) Vineis, P., Alavanja, M., Buffler, P., Fontham, E., Franceschi, S., Gao, Y.T., et al. (2004). Tobacco and cancer: Recent epidemiological evidence. Journal of National Cancer Institute, 96: 99-106.; Jha, P., Ramasundarahettige, C., Landsman, V., Rostron, B., Thun, M., Anderson, R. N., et al. (2013). 21st century hazards of smoking and benefits of cessation in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 368, 341-350. 4) Fergusson, D (2015). Christchurch Health and Development Study: Overview of 40 Years of Findings (2015). ASH Scotland (2012). Reducing Children’s Exposure to Second Hand Smoke in the Home. 5) Ministry of Health. New Zealand Health Survey (2006/07 – 2017/18) data tables. 6) Ministry of Health. 2009. New Zealand Tobacco Use Survey 2008: Quitting results. Wellington: Ministry of Health.
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  • Regeneration not Incineration - for a Zero Waste Aotearoa
    INCINERATORS POLLUTE OUR AIR In the past, incinerators pumped huge volumes of toxic contaminants into our skies. While it’s true that today’s incinerators are cleaner, they’re still not perfect. Among the exhaust gases released by modern incinerators are toxic chemicals that include dioxins [4], mercury [5] and cadmium [6] – substances that cause cancer, nerve damage and birth defects. Anyone who lives downwind from an incinerator is in danger of breathing in these dangerous chemicals and suffering the health consequences as a result. [7] Toxins released into the air fall back onto the land to be absorbed by plants and eaten by livestock eventually finding their way into our food chain and into our bodies causing sickness and disease. [8] But the worst part about the types of toxins released from incinerators is that many of them don’t break down with some persisting in their toxic state in the environment for decades. [9] INCINERATORS POLLUTE OUR LAND Ten to twenty-five per cent of the mass of burnt waste falls to the bottom of an incinerator to become incinerator bottom ash, or IBA. This extremely toxic material is mostly dumped in special hazardous waste landfills, but in some countries it’s also used in roading and construction and sometimes spread on land as fertiliser. [10] Researchers are now raising serious concerns about the dangers of IBA with numerous studies [11] showing the detrimental effects of this highly toxic material. These problems are compounded by disposal to landfill of filters that capture highly toxic fly ash coming out of incinerator smokestacks. These filters are disposed of in hazardous waste landfills along with IBA where they contribute to the toxic load in the landfills. INCINERATORS POLLUTE OUR FRESHWATER AND MARINE ENVIRONMENTS Incinerator toxins falling back on the land are regularly washed into waterways where they combine with leachate from hazardous waste landfills. These contaminants poison fish and other aquatic life as they flow through our streams and rivers into our harbours and eventually into our oceans. Aside from the toll toxins take on our environment, they have the potential to enter our food chain at every stage of their journey to the sea. INCINERATORS RELEASE GREENHOUSE GASES While toxins emitted from incinerator smokestacks cause immediate health concerns, most of the exhaust gas is carbon dioxide, which has long term effects on our climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports that each tonne of waste burnt produces up to 1.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide [12] which can stay in our atmosphere contributing to global warming for decades. Throughout the world, we’re looking for ways to urgently reduce our climate change emissions. Waste-to-energy incinerators work in direct competition with this goal. Incinerators contravene our climate change commitments as signatories to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, the Paris Climate Agreement, and Agenda 2030. And, they directly contradict support for our Pacific partners through endorsement and support for the Kainaki II Declaration (which declares a climate crisis in the Pacific region) and, our signed commitment to the Boe Declaration on Pacific security. INCINERATORS ARE INEFFICIENT While incineration companies are happy to point out that the waste they burn would otherwise be sent to landfill, they don’t mention that household waste is a substandard fuel. The World Energy Council found that, kilogram for kilogram, waste produces less than one-third the energy of coal and up to one-sixth the energy of natural gas while producing many times the amount of pollution. [13] Here in Aotearoa New Zealand, we currently produce 80% of our electricity from renewable sources. And, we have a plan to increase that to 100% by 2035. [14] Waste-to-energy incinerators compete with our renewable energy goals and undermine our commitment to a low emissions economy. INCINERATORS DESTROY VALUABLE RESOURCES Our society is fast becoming aware than our finite planet does not have an unending supply of natural resources. At the same time, we’re learning the importance of protecting and recirculating our resources. Governments, businesses and communities everywhere are looking for better ways to encourage people to refuse, reduce, redesign, reuse, repair, refurbish and recycle the things we use to make sure our resources are not destroyed. Incinerators work in direct conflict with these zero waste objectives. INCINERATORS DESTROY JOBS A key selling point used by incinerator companies is that they create jobs. Disputing this argument, the EU social enterprise reuse, repair, and recycling group, RREUSE, recently found that for every job that the incineration industry might create, recycling centres create 36 jobs and reuse activities create 296 jobs. [15] Materials recovery and recycling services are set to become a rapidly growing sector in the country as our society moves towards a post-waste circular economy. Incineration undermines this plan. INCINERATORS DESTROY ZERO WASTE EFFORTS As a collective of organisations committed to the principle of zero waste, we recognise incineration as one the most toxic and destructive waste management methods. While we accept that waste is a problem, we know that incinerators aren’t the answer. Waste-to-energy incineration produces a non-renewable source of energy that destroys and contaminates our finite natural resources. Here in Aotearoa New Zealand, we can address our waste issues in regenerative ways that preserve rather than destroy valuable resources, prevent pollution, produce sustainable and innovative products and material systems, create jobs, and invigorate a zero waste circular economy. To help achieve this goal, we hope you will join us in opposing waste-to-energy incinerators in Aotearoa New Zealand. Footnotes: https://tinyurl.com/y5chaw5k
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  • Cancel 'Feminism 2020' at Massey
    It has come to our attention that in November this year, Massey University is hosting the event ‘Feminism 2020’ on its Wellington campus. The event is run by Speak up for Women (SUFW) who advocate against trans rights and spread scaremongering misinformation about trans people. SUFW masquerade under the guise of feminism, while actively turning transgender lives into a subject of debate; a dehumanising and harmful rhetoric. Massey Students’ Association stands for free speech and we respect the right of external groups to host events on campus. However, one of the key tenets of free speech is recognising that marginalised groups often don’t enjoy the same rights to freedom of expression. So with that in mind, Massey Students’ Association is choosing to prioritise the voices of our trans whānau who have told us that this event hurts them. By providing a platform for a hate group to speak on our campus, Massey University is putting ‘freedom of speech’ over the safety of its staff and students. Allowing this event to go ahead on campus will harm the trans community both directly; with ‘Speak up for Women’s’ attempting to spread their dehumanising ideology within our community and indirectly; by showing our students that Massey University is providing a space for people to spread hate and harmful anti-trans rhetoric. This is incredibly harmful to an already vulnerable group, with 71% of trans people reporting high or very high psychological distress in 2019’s Counting Ourselves community report. Massey is not obligated to host and provide a platform for an intolerant ideology that advocates for policies that make trans people feel less safe in the world. Freedom of speech doesn’t mean that we have to host an event that will cause harm to students on campus. If the University is serious about wanting to protect the rights of their transgender students there is no excuse in hosting this event. The student community already feel less safe on campus because of Massey’s decision to allow the event to go ahead. Within a few days of announcing the event, our campus has been plastered with trans-exclusionary radical feminist (TERF) stickers. MAWSA has met with UniQ and consulted the trans-community on campus, and the message from the student community is clear; the presence of this event on our campus is already damaging the wellbeing and safety of trans, intersex and queer communities. To prevent further harm to our student community, MAWSA requests, on behalf of Massey Wellington Students, that Massey University cancels ‘Feminism 2020’ within the next 24 hours. There is no room for hate on this campus. The group 'Speak up for Women' advocate against trans rights and spread scaremongering misinformation about trans people. SUFW masquerade under the guise of feminism, while actively turning transgender lives into a subject of debate; a dehumanising and harmful rhetoric. By hosting the 'Feminism 2020' event Massey are providing a platform for hate and division to be spread here and make trans and queer people feel unsafe. This is incredibly harmful to an already vulnerable group, with 71% of trans people reporting high or very high psychological distress in 2019’s Counting Ourselves community report. MAWSA is not in support of this and we stand with our trans community. The effect of such an event has already been seen, with anti-trans stickers already being plastered around campus. Online hate has been spread, our trans students are being put in direct danger and we only see this getting worse if this event is not cancelled.
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  • Bring Priya and her girls to safety in New Zealand
    Most of us believe family comes first. But in just a matter of days, some people in the Australian government could deport two small girls to their death - unless the New Zealand government offers them safety. Picture this: Two small girls scream with fear as they are forced to watch their mum being physically dragging onto a plane - she fights the attempt to deport her back to Sri Lanka, a country she escaped after watching her fiancé be burnt alive. Priya knows that if she and her daughters are forced back, her daughters may suffer the same fate, or even worse as revenge for her escape, like any mum, she is fighting for her children’s safety. Tharunicaa and Kopika are 2 and 4, they were born in Australia and have lived their whole lives in the town of Biloela, a community that loves them and their parents Priya and Nades and is desperately fighting for them to stay. The whole town wants them back home, but instead the Australian government has sent them to Christmas Island, a detention centre routinely used for the deportation of people with criminal convictions and which our own politicians have described as disgraceful. While the Australian government is refusing to let them go home, we are begging the NZ government to step in and save these two girls from likely death. A temporary court injunction has stopped the deportation until Friday this week but without an intervention, their future remains uncertain and terrifying. New Zealand has previously taken refugees rejected by Australia. In 2001, Australia refused entry to 433 refugees on the Tampa. Those people were welcomed by New Zealand and have gone on to become small business owners, doctors, nurses, public servants, students, keen rugby players and even a Fulbright scholar. Priya’s husband, Nades, who she met in Australia has been working in the Biloela meatworks for over five years until they were taken into detention. He is hardworking and capable and, with meatworks employers across New Zealand screaming out for more workers he can start working straight away to support his family. They are the kind of family New Zealand needs and could have the same incredible impact on any new Zealand community that they have on the families of Biloela. They are now two days away from being deported back to danger. They are the only refugees on abandoned Christmas Island prison. Tharunicaa and Kopika cannot stop crying, asking when they can leave this scary place and go back to their home. It’s time for us to bring them here and allow them to make New Zealand their home. Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/04/biloela-tamil-familys-deportation-blocked-until-at-least-friday
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  • Support the Lets Get Wellington Riding Vision
    We're seeing electric bikes and scooters sales grow at 100% year on year, and we've seen an increase in commute cycling of 25-40% across the city in the last year. They're often the fastest and cheapest ways around the city. We should be doing everything we can to support them. These new vehicles need safe space to operate on the road. The current plans for cycleways were developed before the explosion in these new types of vehicles. As such, it's no longer fit for purpose. We’ve designed the Let's Get Welly Riding Vision for Wellingtonians to take and run with (or ride, as the case may be). We hope you are inspired and join us in making Welly the best place in the world to live!
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  • Sort out the partnership visa processing delay at Immigration New Zealand
    We believe all Kiwis highly value our family relationships. Yet the Immigration New Zealand office in Mumbai is creating long delays to process any application from the south and southeast Asian countries including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Philippines, and other countries. This issue is affecting by 10000 of people who currently live in New Zealand because their partnership visa has not been allocated to a case officer. This failure of the administration is affecting people’s lives and ripping apart families. Delays to visa processing, which began last November still continues to separate families now, families which are waiting to reunite in New Zealand, including newly wedded couples and new-born babies. Immigration New Zealand closed many offshore offices due to 2018 restructure and has not hired enough staff to process the incoming applications. If this is causing the problem then the Minister must address this. According to INZ, in the last five years of operation to obtain a partnership visitor visa takes more no than 2-3 months.However, people who are desperately waiting for their visa application are waiting to be allocated to a case officer for at least 6-7 months. This long separation is heartbreaking from a partner or family’s perspective, who are already in New Zealand waiting for many months. INZ also fails to process student visas in a timely way, with some students waiting for 6 months without updates and unable to start their courses. Most of them must then consider going to another country like Canada, Australia, the United States and affects New Zealand’s reputation across the globe. Hundreds of letters of complaints have been sent to INZ and the Immigration Minister. If you wish to you can email the Minister directly at iain.lees-galloway@parliament.govt.nz. Together we are strong - I tahi e kaha ana tatou Visa delay forces heartbroken mum to leave the baby in India https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/389934/visa-delay-forces-heartbroken-mum-to-leave-baby-in-india https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/395898/visa-protest-rally-my-life-has-been-put-on-hold-husband-says https://www.stuff.co.nz/tarana/114765307/protesters-brave-stormy-auckland-weather-to-voice-out-against-visa-delays-by-immigration-new-zealand https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/394571/visa-delays-causing-heartbreak-for-foreign-couples New Zealand visa applications ignored for months as immigration struggles with targets https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/386918/new-zealand-visa-applications-ignored-for-months-as-immigration-struggles-with-targets Concerns visa delays could cost education sector billions https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/391732/concerns-visa-delays-could-cost-education-sector-billions Businesses and immigrants hit out at visa delays https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/386388/businesses-and-immigrants-hit-out-at-visa-delays Immigration NZ's $25m plan to cut nearly 400 jobs https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/107056154/immigration-nzs-25m-plan-to-cut-nearly-400-jobs
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  • Pledge your vote to candidates who care for our Invercargill disabled community
    He tangata, he tangata, he tangata. It is people, it is people, it is people. Invercargill's disabled community has many members who work for Southland disAbility Enterprises. The current recycling contract is 70% of the work, and losing the contract will put many vulnerable people in our community in a very difficult position. The news that they were not the preferred contractor is very disappointing, and goes against the wishes of 15 thousand Southlanders who already signed a previous petition opposing this action by wastenet. The last on the staff is devastating : "The news came as a surprise to the family and employees who heard it. Margaret Fitzgerald said the decision shouldn't come down to money - ''it's a social responsibility''. Ms Fitzgerald, whose sister works on the current WasteNet contract, said losing the contract would have a huge impact. ''She has a purpose in life, she has a purpose to get out of bed every day, they all do ... this contract is everything for them. ''We're not going to give up; there's no way we're giving up now. Today is a very emotional day for us, but we'll fight.'' https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/sde-informs-staff-contract-probably-lost
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  • Pledge your support for the Dementia Declaration
    Nearly 70,000 people have dementia now and we expect that number to increase to 170,000 by 2050 as New Zealand’s population continues to age. And that is just the tip of the iceberg. For every person diagnosed with dementia there are family, whānau and friends also affected by the diagnosis. It is distressing to watch people struggle so much, and to see the spiraling impacts of that struggle. But it is not too late to change the game, to put in place the systems, support and services that New Zealanders are going to need in coming years, and to reduce the cost burden on the country.
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  • Ask the Govt to define Islamophobia & show solidarity with Muslims
    Defining Islamophobia is the only way to fight it! Right now, there is no definition of what constitutes as Islamophobia. Defining Islamophobia will not only help challenge it but build a common understanding of its cause and consequences, and express solidarity with your Muslim communities. Why hold media to account? An Islamophobic headline plastered over our national newspapers has far greater implication than individual comments on social media. Yet, while individuals can be punished for up to 14 years for hate speech, powerful media companies remain unaccountable. Daily Islamophobic statements in the media continue unchecked for bias because there are no consequences. Clearly, the media believes a public platform does not come with social responsibility. Earlier this week Media company NZME removed some of its online content in the wake of Christchurch shootings because it was "upsetting people" [1] As one user put it “It's not enough to quietly remove your complicity in the racism and hate (and lies) that created this” You’d be forgiven for thinking there is no bias in our media, however in 2017 New Zealand media featured 14,349 stories that included the word Islam - nearly 13,000 of those stories mentioned either terrorism or Islamic Jihad [2] A new study of six newspapers in Australia found 2,891 negative stories about Islam and Muslims in a single 12 months [2017] [3] Per day this represents 8 negative stories! Headlines in Britain “Muslims Silent on Terror,” [later refuted by UK officials], “Muslims Tell British: Go to Hell,”, “Muslim Schools Ban Our Culture,” are commonplace [3]. Often, they are retracted when challenged for bias. But, the damage is already done! Is it any wonder the Christchurch mosque terrorist came to view the world as locked in a violent battle against Muslims he deemed “invaders,”? We are told Muslims are violent and Islam preaches violence. How did Muslims react in the aftermath of Christchurch? So, why does the media keep pushing beliefs and teachings antithetical to Islam. Do we continue to give free reign to our news media which is intent on making us more violent. What is the price of lives lost in Christchurch. We’ve all looked the other way in the face of racism, now is the time to do something different. Aaliya, Safia, Marian, Leslie References 1) https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/christchurch-shooting/111376467/upset-following-christchurch-shootings-prompts-nzme-to-take-some-content-offline 2) https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/mediawatch/audio/2018687496/mediawatch-midweek-20-march-2019 3) https://www.trtworld.com/opinion/rupert-murdoch-s-islamophobic-media-empire-25079
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  • Limit aircraft noise and pollution over Wattle Downs and South Auckland
    Over the past few years, the neighbourhoods of Wattle Downs, Weymouth, Clendon, Manurewa and Wiri have been subjected to increased aircraft activity creating excessive noise and air pollution both night and day as a result of the Smart Path Trials. There is an endless onslaught of low flying aircraft which has serious impacts on the health and wellbeing of those on the ground close to airports and flight paths. Recently a noise monitor was installed in Wattle Downs. The report over the Winter months indicated that of the average 57 flights per day excessive noise events occurred in 20 flights each day. This is set to increase over summer. We strongly believe that the Airport Authority has conducted unfair and unjust practices towards the residents of Wattle Downs in particular and South Auckland in general over the Smart Path Trials which were conducted over a two year period without notification to those affected. The Southern Flight path and the two Northern Paths use satellite technology which condenses traffic in and out of airports over concentrated areas. The Trials were conducted differently and had discriminatory results. The two northern flight paths were monitored for noise prior to, during and following the trials ● The number of flights were limited, 5 flights to 10 flights per day ● There was a ban on flights during 10pm at night and 7am in the morning ● The communities had press coverage, consultation and a review process ● The negative feedback from residents resulted in the proposed number of flights, (30 per day) being cancelled and landing procedures amended to mitigate noise complaints. ● Total flights for both flight paths for the trial period was 1704 The southern flight path had no noise monitoring prior to during or after the trials, and ● There was no limit on the number of flights over the south ● There was no night time bans on flights, flights being permitted 24 hours a day ● There was no public awareness about these trials and noise complaints dismissed ● There was no consultation process with residents and thus no reviews of the trials ● Total number of flights over trial period: 10,118 The following actions are required: 1. Investigate the process that Auckland Airport Authority followed in allocating flight paths to and from Auckland Airports 2. Justly distribute aircraft noise and air pollution over the entire Auckland area 3. Ban ALL night time flights over residential areas not just those from affluent Auckland areas 4. Implement ALL known noise mitigation tools and strategies to alleviate unbearable noise and air pollution burdens 5. Review all procedures including redress for affected communities 6. Ensure that strong protections for communities and citizens near airports are built into Parliamentary Bills 7. Require that the Aviation Authorities inform and enter into dialogue with any potentially impacted communities of any changes in flight paths or procedures that would impact them. 8. Set up a Health and Medical committee to collate all available scientific information on this public health issue and report it's findings 9. Reassign the responsibility for environmental impact and monitoring and enforcement of acceptable noise and air quality levels to the New Zealand Environmental Protection Agency rather than the New Zealand Aviation Administration which has an inherent conflict of interest https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/69290065/aircraft-noise-a-headache-for-residents https://corporate.aucklandairport.co.nz ANCCG https://corporate.aucklandairport.co.nz/corporate-responsibility/managing-aircraft-noise/being-a-good-neighbour/aircraft-noise-community-consultative-group
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  • Safe parking for the staff of Middlemore Hospital
    The cars of Middlemore Hospital staff are frequently broken into, causing distress and unexpected costs for the staff. This happens in the staff parking lots which are too easily accessible for people from outside the hospital. Windows are smashed, things are stolen, steering wheels are broken, ignitions damaged. The fact that this mostly happens at night is very stressful for the staff who finish a shift at midnight and then often cannot drive themselves home because their cars have been damaged. There is also not enough parking for all the staff at the hospital.
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  • Put children and whānau wellbeing at the heart of welfare
    In good times and in hard times, we should all have the dignity and security of a roof over our head, healthy kai on the table and the essential things we need. A stable whare (house) is the foundation for a good life. None of us can go about our lives, raise a family, go to work or stay healthy without a warm, dry and safe place to call home. But right now, due to the way in which successive governments have run down the welfare system, and taken a hands-off approach to the housing market, New Zealand’s homes are some of the least affordable in the industrial world. Families are having to choose between rent and food. When people lose their job, get sick or end a relationship and then can’t keep a roof over their heads, we are seeing the failures of an unkind, unjust and unbalanced economic system. When corporations are taking in record profits, but there hasn’t been a real increase in income support for a generation, and more and more people can’t make ends meet, our society is out of balance. These statistics should both astound and compel us into action: ➡️ The wealthiest 20 percent of people in New Zealand hoard 70 percent of the wealth, while the poorest 40 percent have just three percent. ➡️ Two New Zealand billionaires have more combined wealth than the poorest 30 percent of people in this country. ➡️ Over 50 percent of all people in New Zealand who receive an Accommodation Supplement to pay for their housing needs are spending more than half their incomes on housing, while four out of every five renters cannot afford to pay their rent comfortably. ➡️ The median Pākehā has $114,000 of wealth. The median Māori has $23,000. That’s a gap of $91,000. The median Pasifika person has even less at $12,000. ➡️ Between 2004 and 2010 the wealth of the richest one percent - about 34,000 people - increased from $94billion to $147billion; that’s $4,323,529 per person. Meanwhile the poorest 10 percent of people saw their net debt increase from $5.7billion to $7.4billion. CEO pay is increasing at almost five times the rate of the average worker. ➡️ 27 percent of New Zealand’s children live in poverty, where poverty is defined as having less than 60 percent of the national median household income (after housing costs), while six percent (70,000) of all children live in severe hardship. ➡️ There are now at least 41,000 homeless New Zealanders, more than half of whom are younger than 25. There is too much wealth in too few hands while everyday New Zealanders struggle to make ends meet and the cost of living continues to soar. We need government intervention to end the poverty trap and rebalance our economy. We need government intervention to ensure that everyone one in this country has enough pūtea (income) to live with dignity and participate fully in the community. If we are to fulfil the Coalition Government’s goal for Aotearoa to be the best place in the world to be a child, then all parents, whānau and caregivers must have a liveable income. A hands-on government can fix our broken economic system. A hands-on government can change the rules to make our economy fair, kind and just. A competent and caring government can ensure that every child and whānau flourishes. Read more: http://www.welfareforwellbeing.org Image credits: Serena Stevenson Photography
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