• Provide a shelter for Rotorua homeless
    Rotorua is second to Auckland for its number of homeless.[1] Given the comparative size of the two cities and those elsewhere in the country, this constitutes a large proportion of the local population. Many of the homeless become particularly ill over winter. The majority of Rotorua's homeless prefer to live outdoors, but the weather takes its toll. Many are not use to living indoors, however they need a place of refuge near the city centre, when inclement weather occurs. They also need a place to wash, go to the toilet and a place to store such equipment as sleeping bags. An open sided shelter, with possibly one wall to provide privacy and protection from prevailing winds would provide more comfort and safety. The make up of homeless is complex and has indeed been exacerbated by the problem with housing unaffordability.[2] The reality is that while unaffordability of housing appears here to stay there is a large proportion of the population who simply do not know how to live in houses and sleep in our parks, under thermal pipes and for many in Rotorua on the verandah of the Tea House in the Government Gardens. Currently there are up to 110 who meet regularly at the Government Gardens where they are given an evening meal. A similar number receive an evening meal from the Love Soup initiative. Approaches have been made to the City Council. Unfortunately any requests to them appears to go under their radar. The fact that Phil Twyford, Minister for Housing, is alarmed at the homeless situation means possible pressure may come onto local Councils to do more. Consideration given to the setting up of a ministerial portfolio for the homeless, is possible in July. The vision for this petition is for land in a central location, ideally between the Lake and the Government Gardens, to be provided in an area out of sight from most residents and visitors to the city. A one walled shelter be built that would provide space sufficient for those needing to be out of the rain and a wall that provides not only privacy but protection from the wind be included. Additional consideration needs to be given to ablution amenities, showers, a laundry facility and changing rooms. These would be a long the lines of camping ground amenities. The Council would be responsible for the maintenance of the facility in the same way they do for other public amenities. The exception being these facilities would not be locked or closed in the evenings. 1 - Gina Peiffer, Rotorua Post April 23, 2017 2 - Rotorua Post Oct 14, 2017 3 - Homeless headcount finds 48 people sleeping rough in Rotorua http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-daily-post/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503438&objectid=12007900 4 - Homelessness on the rise in Rotorua http://www.maoritelevision.com/news/regional/homelessness-on-rise-rotorua
    40 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Gary Parker
  • Save our bank and post office
    NZ Post and Kiwi Bank provide important services and it's not just mailing letters and banking money. But their "for profit" motive is being put before serving the New Zealand public. These are publicly owned businesses which should serve the public. Sadly, services are being cut, prices are going up and branches are closing all over the country. NZ Post has been closing branches for decades and the Newtown post office on Riddiford st is the next on the block. This would leave only the Kilbirnie post office and Kiwi Bank for all of the eastern suburbs. Everything from ID photos to car registration can be sorted at these offices. A one stop shop for many admin things is important for people, especially those with limited access to modern technology and limited mobility. Other than the obvious job losses these further closures will effect people badly. These State Owned Enterprises should be operating in the interests of the public, instead they are prioritising profit, often accompanied by cutting services, increasing costs, and closing outlets. It's time to organise and draw a line in the sand. Please sign this petition. If you would like to help with the campaign please email warwick.weatherman@gmail.com For recent media see http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1801/S00497/action-to-stop-the-closure-of-newtown-post-shopkiwibank.htm
    409 of 500 Signatures
    Created by James Barber
  • Eat Right Be Bright - School Lunch for All Kiwi Kids
    Sign our petition: We are a group of 100+ ordinary Mums from a variety of backgrounds. We believe passionately that all children are our children. That all children in New Zealand, wherever they are, whatever their circumstances, have the right to access their education on an equal footing and to nutritious food to nourish their mind, lives and spirit. We believe a centrally funded, secured, healthy school lunch programme for all is a powerful mechanism for New Zealand to fulfill these obligations to our children, to lift them up and break the poverty cycle. We are deeply concerned that: • 1 in 4 of our kids are living in poverty. • 1 in 3 of our kids are overweight or obese. • 1 in 3 of all kids admitted to Starship Hospital are malnourished to some degree. We know that minimum wage earning and beneficiary families need to spend up to 52% of their income to purchase a basic healthy diet (Otago University Food Costs Survey 2011); some reports put that now at 60%. We know that higher rates of diabetes, obesity, infectious diseases, fatigue, poor mental health, greater psychological stress and poor academic development in children are found where healthy food is less accessible. We know cheap, accessible food is energy rich but nutrient poor meaning children are malnourished whilst also obese. This does currently, and will increasingly, put a chronic strain on the public health system. We know that charities currently reach some children in need with their food programmes (of varying nutritional value) in deciles 1-4 schools. However, they are stretched and they cannot and should not be expected to shoulder the burden in perpetuity when all New Zealanders will benefit from healthy, well educated children. Teachers also tell us that children are going to school without lunch in all deciles or simply not attending school at all due to the shame of not having a lunch to bring. Kids such as Blake (not his real name). He moved to a new school when his family sought refuge in a Womens' Refuge Centre away from his old area. He knew that a charity delivered hot food to his old school two days a week in the winter. The following week after his move, Blake walked 7km to his old school because he knew there would be hot food there on that day. A teacher asked him why he had walked so far back to his old school. Blake answered that it was because he hadn't eaten a meal since he had changed schools and he was hungry. Or, like Ellie (not her real name), who goes to a school in an affluent neighbourhood. She often attends school without a lunch. The teachers started to sneak a lunch, from their own pockets, into her schoolbag as discreetly as they could. Ellie now hands back the teachers' lunch because she would rather be hungry than accept charity from others. We say, this stops now. Only a school lunch for all kids will capture every child in need, free from shame and stigma. All our children will benefit from the health and education uplift provided by a school lunch programme. For the children most in need, that uplift is greatest. Better educated and healthier children benefits all New Zealanders with less children needing doctors and more children being doctors. We know that New Zealand is one of the few countries in the world with no national, government funded school meals programme. In most countries around the world it is uncontroversial, part and parcel of going to school. We believe that all kiwi kids deserve the same social protection and investment in their lives as their global peers. We have decided it’s time to stand up and stand together for our children. It is clear to us that only with a centrally funded programme in all schools and early childhood education centres throughout our country will we reach all children in need, wherever they are, whatever their circumstance, free from shame and stigma. The provision of a school lunch as of right, with dignity, in this way tells a child that we, as a society, value them. The provision of daily healthy and nutritious food in a school lunch sets all children up for a healthier and better educated life. This benefits all of us. Eat Right Be Bright Join us in making change for a brighter future our children. Sign the petition. Find out more ways to help and follow us on: Facebook - @likeamumNZ or Eat Right Be Bright NZ Website - www.eatrightbebright.org.nz Instagram - @eatrightbebright_nz or eatrightbebrightn_z Twitter - @eatrightNZ
    4,853 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Becky Little
  • Auckland needs a Night Shelter
    Currently homelessness is increasing faster than the growth of housing supply (Auckland Council Environment and Community Committee, August 2017). This means that with the best intentions of getting people into housing, they will be spending time in inadequate shelter before this happens. A night shelter is needed, alongside initiatives such as the Housing First programme. A night shelter acts as a place of transition for people without a home, where they can have a degree of comfort and security. It is a base from where they can contact their support networks and be put in touch with the various agencies that can provide the assistance they need. As stated by the City Missioner in July 2017, the average life expectancy of a homeless person is 55. Hundreds of people are sleeping on Auckland streets, where it is not safe, and in the winter, it is cold and wet. Michelle Kidd, QSM, a social worker who has been campaigning for a night shelter for many years, described the situation in her open letter to Auckland mayoral candidates on 4 May 2016: "Most of our Homeless are either victims of Auckland’s deepening housing crisis, victims of physical or emotional abuse or neglect, suffer from disability, mental health or addiction issues, have little or no formal education or a combination of such factors. Homelessness is a complex issue for which there is no straightforward answer … "Without a stable base, Homeless people have no access to social services that might otherwise enable them to begin confronting the underlying factors that have resulted in them being on the streets. Further, as long as people are left to live on the streets without any support, they will be exposed not only to the elements but also to harm (such as physical and sexual violence)… "Homelessness in Auckland has become a desperate social issue and the time has come for the city to accept its responsibility for it. While any long-term strategy should be informed by the “Housing First” approach, applied with real success in states such as Utah in the United States, a night shelter will always be the necessary starting point - it represents the foundation on which a broader and more robust framework can be built … "Visitors to Auckland are greeted by the sight of our Homeless on the streets of our city - a stark contradiction to the ‘most liveable’ status Auckland craves. The failure of the city to provide basic human needs is on display for all to see. This cannot be allowed to continue.” References An open letter to Auckland mayoral candidates http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11632965 Watch: moves are afoot to set up a night shelter http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/shows/2017/12/gimme-shelter.html Housing First and night shelters http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mark-horvath/its-not-housing-first-or_b_4536727.html A new volunteer has come to central Auckland to help https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/102019944/Fire-chief-moves-from-idyllic-South-Island-town-to-help-Aucklands-homeless Campaign for night shelter continues http://www.tewahanui.nz/politics/campaign-for-auckland-cbd-night-shelter-continues Watch: Maori TV story about the need for a night shelter http://www.maoritelevision.com/news/regional/alleged-rape-homeless-highlights-need-shelter Watch: TVNZ story about plans for a night shelter in Nelson St, City Centre https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/lawyers-auckland-city-safe-haven-homeless-needs-little-bit-more-funding-make-reality?variant=tb_v_1
    2,268 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Audrey van Ryn
  • Ban pokies - protect whānau
    Last year pokie machines took in $890 million from New Zealand communities. This doesn't include the $586 million lost at casinos. The pokie business model is predatory by its nature, relying on the highly addictive design of the machines, and targets people on low incomes. In wealthy areas of our country there is one pokie machine for every 465 people, whereas in poorer areas there is one for every 75 people. This means that much of that $890 million came directly from the pockets of families in hardship. Most recently, the South Waikato District Council approved a site permit for a new mega gambling centre in Tokoroa, a town where many families already face the stresses of unemployment, insecure work and low wages. Former New Zealander of the Year, Dr Lance O'Sullivan has described this plan as "disgraceful" and "predatory". Our Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, has said that reducing child poverty is the reason she got into politics, and has taken on specific responsibility for this as the Minister for Child Poverty reduction. Her government has committed to setting bold goals for reducing poverty, and identified a range of policies that would help to do this. One simple step the Prime Minister could take, which would immediately reduce whānau poverty, would be to ban pokie machines in New Zealand. These machines are highly addictive, and do enormous harm to some of the families doing it toughest in our country. This harm is supposedly justified because a portion of the gambling profits is distributed to community and sports groups. This means the families who are worst off in our communities are not only being exploited by predatory gambling businesses, but also that the people least able to do so are subsidising community services that should be funded by everyone fairly, through taxes. This makes no sense at all. Please add your voice to the call on our Prime Minister to protect families from predatory gambling businesses by banning all pokies now. References: Pokie statistics from Problem Gambling Foundation NZ: https://www.pgf.nz/pokie-statistics.html Ban pokies to reduce child poverty, Newshub: http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2017/11/ban-pokies-to-reduce-child-poverty-lance-o-sullivan-to-pm.html Mega-gambling centre in Tokoroa: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/99550519/tokoroa-mega-gaming-venue-looks-at-tab
    1,218 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Marianne Elliott Picture
  • Introduce universal free dental care
    Many people can’t afford dental check ups, or are put off going to the dentist because of the costs associated with treatment. Dentists are finding tooth conditions associated with countries with much higher levels of poverty than New Zealand, because dental care is expensive for so many of us.[1] The last national dental survey found that about half of New Zealand's population had put off dental treatment they knew they needed because of the cost.[2,3] Dental care is understandably a highly regulated industry and the costs of running a dental clinic are therefore very high. There are also not enough dentists in some regions. It can cost a lot just to get a checkup, putting people off from getting regular review of the health of their teeth. Basic dental services are provided up until 18 - ending at a crucial time when young people are leaving home and are financially constrained. Dental care can take second place to more urgent living costs when under financial stress, putting off care until more serious problems occur. If dental problems are taken care of early it can save a lot more money later on. Left untreated, dental infections can spread leading to serious and sometimes life threatening illnesses that require hospitalisation. Poor oral health has also been linked to conditions like heart disease and diabetes which financially burden the health care system. Further, poor oral health is associated with poorer self-reported quality of life and negatively impacts on employment prospects. A Ministry of Health survey shows that dental problems have an indirect cost to society, with one in ten adults aged 18–64 years taking an average of 2.1 days off work or school in the previous year due to problems with their teeth or mouth.[4] An affordable and accessible dental care service would catch health problems before they become too serious, reduce barriers to good health for our whole population and reducing later health costs. In the meantime there are specific steps that can be taken to improve access to dental care now. To begin with we can take concrete steps to remove cost barriers to good dental care - 1. Subsidise dental care for at-need communities; 2. Age for access to free dental care increased to 20; Sign now to ask the new Minister of Health David Clark to take these concrete steps for better access to dental care for everyone. Media 1 - Making dental care affordable to those who need it most should be a priority – dentist, 20/11/17 https://www.facebook.com/Breakfaston1/videos/10155785527952719/ 2 - Former Prime Minister Helen Clark https://twitter.com/HelenClarkNZ/status/931265560838529024 3 - "Dental decay remains the most prevalent chronic (and irreversible) disease in New Zealand" http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/our-oral-health-key-findings-2009-new-zealand-oral-health-survey 4 - Smile NZ to provide free dental care for low income Kiwis https://www.southerncross.co.nz/group/media-releases/2016/Smile-NZ-to-provide-free-dental-care-for-low-income-Kiwis 5 - Helen Clark calls for Govt to implement free dental care, 17/1117 http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/politics/helen-clark-calls-for-govt-to-implement-free-dental-care/ 6 - Dental expert says dental care in NZ treated like 'luxury', calls for funding overhaul 20/11/17 https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/dental-expert-says-care-in-nz-treated-like-luxury-calls-funding-overhaul
    10,502 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Revive A Smile Picture
  • Put mental health first
    We ask for mental health to be an integral part of primary health care, and the following steps to be taken: - Place mental health professionals in GP clinics. This could be making available a room in a GP clinic one day a week specifically for people presenting with mental health concerns. For smaller practices the resource could be shared. - Ring fence mental health funding and increase funding for primary health care. This funding should include increasing the wider mental health workforce including community and peer support workers and health coaches. - Provide funding to upskill GPs and nurses and midwifes in mental health. - Expand funding criteria to include people with mild to moderate mental health presentations. - Provide funding that allows GPs to provide free extended consultations which would include mental health presentations. Although everyone would hope to live in good mental health, the reality for one in five New Zealanders is very different – and for them and their families, the expectation that they should be able to get help when they need it is vital.[1,2] As awareness of mental health grows there is increased demand for health services. This is putting increasing pressure on our underfunded health system. Those most in need are experiencing long waiting times for support and the country is experiencing alarmingly high levels of suicide. General practitioners are often the first point of contact for people with mental disorders, and they need specialist support to be able to recognise, manage and, where appropriate, be recommended to secondary mental health services. The more that mental health issues can be identified and addressed before the serious step of hospitalisation, the healthier our society will be and also precious secondary health care resources will be spared. Research tells us that the earlier we treat mental illnesses the faster a person will recover. If we treat people with mental distress earlier we would decrease the likelihood of long term conditions because mental wellness affects physical, emotional, family and spiritual wellbeing. The integration of mental health into primary health care is being done in various countries around the world.[3] New Zealand is a world leader in the statistics for mental health issues, and should be leading the world in finding solutions. Emphasising mental health in our primary health care and providing adequate funding will be one step forward to answer this. References 1 - https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/assets/Uploads/MHF-Quick-facts-and-stats-FINAL.pdf; https://www.mentalhealth.org.nz/assets/A-Z/Downloads/FS2-Facts-about-young-New-Zealanders-depression.pdf 2 - https://www.peoplesmentalhealthreport.com/ 3 - Integrating mental health into primary care - A global perspective http://www.who.int/mental_health/resources/mentalhealth_PHC_2008.pdf
    230 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Maringikura Mary Campbell
  • Save NZ’s largest study of children and their families
    The government has recently cut funding to Growing Up in New Zealand. What is this research about, who is it for, and why does it matter? Based at the University of Auckland, Growing Up in New Zealand (GUiNZ) is the largest and most diverse longitudinal study to ever track the lives of children in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is the only study to track them from before birth through young adulthood. This groundbreaking study represents the lives and stories of almost 7000 children and their families, providing unique insight into what shapes children’s early development and how interventions might be targeted at the earliest opportunity to give every New Zealand child the best start in life. Where previous research conducted in Aotearoa/New Zealand had much narrower frames of reference, GUiNZ is the first study specifically designed to look at outcomes for Māori, Pasifika, and Asian children. The study is an important and unique opportunity to support the children of Aotearoa/New Zealand – it tracks the socioeconomic factors that lead to inequality, while also picking up other influences such as disability and disease. The government recently cut funding to GUiNZ. These cuts will result in only having enough money to collect information from 2000 participants in the upcoming data collection wave. While some may argue that children left out of this wave can be picked up next time, if continuity is lost, the data can no longer be called truly longitudinal. Inadequate funding of GUiNZ will create holes in the data. There is a risk with such a reduced cohort size, that researchers will no longer able to identify when risk factors facing our tamariki become statistically significant. For the research to succeed (to be able to conduct good, sound, scientific analysis for as many health and wellbeing outcomes as possible) it is essential that all dots stay connected. Losing continuity is disrespectful of all the time and effort this huge group of participating whānau has donated –finding and retaining participants will become so much harder. Why has this funding been cut? The current government believes that "big data" (data collected during our everyday dealings with governmental systems like the doctor and WINZ) can tell us all we need to know. Those with any scientific training can tell you it can't, and it won't. Gathering data from people before we know what is going to happen in the lives, shows us so much more. Big data doesn’t have access to biological samples, nor does it give us the depth of information required to understand why families make the choices they do. Please sign and share our petition. Then talk about this study - to your family, to your neighbours, to your friends, to your MP and local candidates. The more people that know about this, the more likely we are to have funding restored. We believe the funding of this critical research should be a priority for the next government of New Zealand. Thank you for showing us you think this is important, too. http://www.growingup.co.nz/en/about-the-study.html http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/84054547/Is-the-future-of-the-ambitious-Growing-up-in-NZ-Study-in-doubt
    6,092 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by Katie Tuck
  • Support Healthy Housing in New Zealand
    The home environment we live in plays a huge role in our own health, and the health of our families. Every winter in New Zealand, about 1600 deaths are attributed to people living in cold, damp homes (1). Compared to many other developed countries, New Zealand has much higher rates of people being hospitalised for lung diseases such as asthma (2). Living in cold, damp, mouldy environments places our families at much greater risk of having acute attacks. It is incredibly important that people with such illnesses are not treated just to be sent home to the environment that made them sick. The World Health Organisation recommends that houses should be insulated so that they are at least 18°C, a minimum temperature where lung (respiratory) illnesses are less likely to occur (3). Unfortunately up to a third of New Zealand’s homes do not meet this minimum standard, with the average temperature in poorer households being 13°C (3,4). This issue is therefore impacting on the health of our poorest communities and needs to be addressed by our government. It is also clear that insulating homes well would be much more cost-effective for the government. Programmes such as “Warm Up New Zealand” have shown that the savings associated with subsidising insulation and heaters far outweighs the costs by nearly 4 times (cost-benefit ratio of 3.9) (5). The government currently spends $5.5 billion per year on lung (respiratory) illnesses such as asthma, with much of this being preventable (6). Without a doubt, we strongly believe the Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No.2) is a step in the right direction. However there is still much that needs to be done. Together, we can make a difference in ensuring that New Zealand homes are warm and insulated, to improve the health of our children and families. References 1. Nichol R. 1600 deaths attributed to cold houses each winter in New Zealand. The New Zealand Listener. June 2017. http://www.noted.co.nz/currently/social-issues/1600-deaths-attributed-to-cold-houses-each-winter-in-new-zealand/#.WT9lYy9meGk.facebook 2. OECD (2011), Health at a Glance 2011: OECD Indicators, OECD Publishing. 3. Auckland Regional Public Health Service. Housing and Health in Auckland. Chapter 6: Cold, Damp and Mould. Pages 25-27. 2005. 4. Howden-Chapman P, Matheson A, Crane J, Viggers H, Cunningham M, Blakely T, et al. Effect of insulating existing houses on health inequality: cluster randomised study in the community. BMJ. 2007;334(7591):460. 5. Howden-Chapman P, Arnold R, Telfar-Barnard L, Preval N, Young C. Cost Benefit Analysis of the Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart Programme. 2012. 6. Barnard L, Baker M, Pierse N, Zhang J. The impact of respiratory disease in New Zealand: 2014 update. 2015
    1,101 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by MSGA New Zealand
  • Pay equity for aged care Nurses
    Recently the government passed an historic pay equity claim for health care assistants and support workers which is being widely celebrated in aged care. It is fantastic to hear that these hard working carers will be paid a liveable wage for the excellent work they do in an important sector of healthcare. However with this pay rise for health care assistants and support workers, the issue surrounding Registered Nurse pay rates in aged care is highlighted. Registered nurses in the aged care sector have long been overlooked, and on average make $5-15 less* than DHB acute care nurses with the same years of experience. The standard rate of pay for health care assistants is now only $1-4 less than an aged care Registered Nurse, despite the level of responsibility we take or experience we have. Within 5 years of the new pay scale plan the health care assistants will begin on a higher rate than many aged care nurses earn even after several years experience. We are the ones delegating the tasks, and addressing complicated health, social and emotional issues that arise from the care of our most vulnerable. We are caring for those with multiple co-morbidities, working without a doctor onsite, making difficult decisions on a day to day basis, using a broad and varied range of knowledge of both acute and chronic care management and end of life care. As we make these decisions, we are liable. Is the level of responsibility we take really only worth an extra dollar or two than a health care assistant? Is my degree really worth so little to the government? Aged care nurses are crucial, but if they are not paid what they are worth, many will continue to leave the sector, and few will enter it. Why become an aged care nurse if you make less than an acute care nurse? Why enter the nursing field if you can be on a higher rate as an HCA without the 3 year degree? Without the critical thinking and knowledge of RNs, the aged care sector will soon fall apart. We need to be encouraging nurses into the sector as it grows, and paying them what they are worth for the complicated and difficult work they do everyday. However with the limited funding available this is an issue our managers cannot afford to address without support from the government. *based on rates at my workplace vs. local DHB
    2,204 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Sarah Blackstock
  • Housing Crisis 2017, Fix the Issue!
    As a Year 13 Social Studies assessment we have been reviewing The Social Housing Reform Programme and how it could be improved to help fix the housing crisis in New Zealand! In New Zealand 42,000 (1 out of every 100) kiwis are moving between temporary and insecure housing and are lead to seek night shelters, emergency housing and refuges and it needs to be fixed. We believe that data is needed to be included within the Social Housing Reform Programme, they are only motives so we would like to add in a few policies we would like to encourage. All of these points within the programme are good but we would like to add in some data as goals to achieve within the near future so we can decrease or ultimately end homelessness in New Zealand. We think that instead of only focusing on social housing, we should (as a nation) be focusing on fixing the issue from a broader spectrum. We enjoyed reviewing your policy but believe there is always room for improvement :) Thank you for taking time out of your day to read our petition, http://www.socialhousing.govt.nz (link to the Social Housing Reform Programme) Thanks, Kendall Northcott and Maia Richmond, Paraparaumu College Year 13 Social Studies Students.
    52 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Maia Richmond
  • Provide adequate healthcare for all our children
    We know too many children (at least 155,000 children) in New Zealand live in a household that can't afford basic things like putting healthy food on the table every day, giving growing children new shoes and having enough money left over to cover unexpected costs. Doctor visits are one of the many unexpected costs. There is increasing evidence poverty is associated with poor health outcomes and about 40,000 hospital admissions of children every year are from preventable illnesses that have links to poverty. Other poor outcomes of poverty include poor mental health that can lead to depression and anxiety in young people. Although there can be lots of reasons why it is hard to seek help for these things, there are two things we can change now; the barriers of cost and access.  Having health services in schools provides easy access for young people while they are in the education system. Having fully funded GP visits for children and young people overcomes the cost barrier for families on low incomes. From July, 2015 GP visits have been fully funded for children up to the age of 13. This has been significant but is not enough. Teenagers also need this help. These are things we can change now. Lets act. References: Gibson, K; Abraham, Q; Asher, I; Black, R ; Turner, N; Waitoki, W. & McMillan, N. "Child Poverty and Mental Health: A Literature Review.” NZ Psychological Society and Child Poverty Action Group. May 2017.
    60 of 100 Signatures
    Created by sara rishworth