• Let's reform homosexual laws in Samoa
    A reform of these sections in the Crimes Act is important because gay rights = human rights. People should be able to love, free of judgement and potential persecution. Polynesia has been sexually diverse for many years and, before colonisation and Christianity, was accepted as apart of the norm. No one should have a permanent criminal conviction, simply for loving who they want to. These laws do not reflect well on the progressive nature of young Samoans today, along with future generations and this inflexible view of sexuality is non-inclusive, discriminatory and extremely conservative. A reform would mean our LGBTQ+ peers are more protected from discrimination and would have the ability to love freely. We understand that, typically, when laws change, mindsets do as well and therefore are asking the Samoan Government to reform these laws to grant this change. Crimes Act PDF for reference: http://www.palemene.ws/new/wp-content/uploads//01.Acts/Acts%202013/Crimes_Act_2013_-_Eng.pdf
    307 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Allyssa Verner-Pula
  • Homes for all
    Right now too many people are living precariously in rented homes that are making them sick. Families continue to live in cars, it’s due to be one of the coldest winters and people are freezing while sleeping on the street, in garages, or huddled up in overcrowded lounges. But together we can fix it. Solving such a complex problem needs multiple solutions. After decades of neglect the Government is finally starting to get it’s hands back on the steering wheel to fix the housing crisis. With our support it can go further. Sign the petition so everyone can live in a stable home.
    213 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Team ActionStation Picture
  • Save Wellington Citizens Advice Bureau!
    Wellington Citizens Advice Bureau provides a free information and advice service to people in need. It helps people know about their rights and responsibilities and the services available in their community. It is there for everyone, about everything. Despite this, Wellington City Council wants to cut its services and leave its citizens without this essential support. Last year Wellington CAB helped over 30,000 people with questions and problems across the range of issues people face in their lives. These include helping with enquiries about emergency accommodation, noisy neighbours, overhanging trees, abandoned vehicles, relationship issues, enquiries about consumer rights, tenancy rights, employment rights, as well as information about local services - the whole range of questions and queries imaginable. It also includes referrals from the City Council and helping people to fill in Council forms! Wellington CAB has had a long-term strategic partnership with Wellington City Council. In spite of this, the Council have, without consultation, made a recommendation to stop funding the Wellington CAB via its long-standing contract for services, and give a one-off six month grant for the CAB to completely redesign its operation, including shutting the doors on its physical premises. The Council have said there is “no guarantee of funding beyond that”. The CAB is core community infrastructure. It is locally responsive, and staffed by dedicated volunteers from the local community. The people who come to the CAB often don’t know where to go, don’t know what assistance is available to them, can’t access information, or are excluded from services. Without the CAB those people will fall through the cracks. Please show your support and save this essential community service.
    4,798 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Sacha Green
  • Hey Auckland Transport, please keep your word on Lynfield bus routes
    Auckland Transport (AT) is about to implement the New (Central Bus) Network in July 2018, without the 191 route they had promised in 2016. After consulting with the community in 2015, AT committed to the new 191 bus route to link Lynfield-Blockhouse Bay-New Lynn in 2016. A map including the new 191 route was produced and the ‘Consultation Summary & Decisions Report’ said “The Puketapapa Local Board has advocated for a bus service to link Lynfield with Blockhouse Bay… This is able to be accommodated by extending the limited (hourly) local service route 191”. This was great news, as many years ago, when the old Auckland City was deciding between putting a new library at Blockhouse Bay or Lynfield, they had gone with Blockhouse Bay and promised Lynfield a bus link that was never delivered. The population of Lynfield has grown a lot since then too, and is about to grow even further with the addition of a large Ryman's retirement village on Commodore Drive. Sadly Lynfield has also lost a lot of the services it used to have - the last bank has gone now, the pharmacy has recently closed (with a new pharmacy coming at some point in the supermarket), and a postal agency but no longer a post shop, as well as the lack of library and civic services. This link to Blockhouse Bay is even more needed that it was when it was first promised many years ago. However AT changed their mind about the 191 route, which will not go ahead. We are calling on AT to keep their word to Lynfield and re-instate this important local service as promised. There isn't another route for people to get from Lynfield to the west, and won't be in the new network either - they will have to catch a route in towards the city and then another one back out (and most likely won't do that at all in many cases). There's a very large steep hill that people would need to walk up, as part of quite a long walk, to get to the bus services that go west. It's not practical for people with mobility issues, and is generally avoided even by fit school children (too many of whom get driven to nearby Lynfield College when this would help them to get there another way). Some people will be driving more, without this vital link, others will be more socially isolated. Organised by Roskill Community Voice and your local Labour MP, Michael Wood. Please sign the petition to add your voice.
    401 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Julie Fairey
  • We demand a public inquiry into banks
    Right now, in Australia, an inquiry into banks and financial insitutitions is uncovering shocking misconduct. “ANZ's financial planners were found to have forged signatures, impersonated customers, fraudulently used power of attorney, falsely witnessed of documents and transferred customer's funds to advisers' personal accounts. AMP was found to have falsely charged customers for service it didn't provide, and then lied to the regulator and customers repeatedly about it.” - Newsroom Pressure is mounting behind the scenes, for us to have trust in our banks there must be a public, transparent inquiry. Secret meetings of men in suits isn’t going to fix this. Will you sign the petition calling for a public inquiry into NZ Banks? Now’s the optimal time to call for an inquiry. The story has been on RNZ’s Morning Report - one of the most listened to news sources - everyday this week. Media attention is powerful, but our collective voices can tip this over the line. Refs: 1. 8 Things Monday, Newsroom, 23 April 2018. https://pro.newsroom.co.nz/articles/2690-8-things-monday-orr-says-no-need-for-nz-bank-inquiry-richard-macmanus-on-spark-s-streaming-tech-challenge 2. The royal commission changed this week - from awful and dumb to utterly shocking, ABC, 21 April 2018 http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-21/royal-commission-changed-this-week-awful-to-shocking/9681942 3. Q+A: Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr, Q+A, 22 April 2018. http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PO1804/S00237/qa-reserve-bank-governor-adrian-orr.htm 4. Kiwi banks told: Prove you're not dodgy too, Stuff, 25 April 2018. www.stuff.co.nz/business/103353429/kiwi-banks-told-prove-youre-not-dodgy-too
    350 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Rick Zwaan Picture
  • Save Social Housing!
    Housing is a right and a basic need. Right now, the Palmerston North City Council has proposed to charge market rent for their social housing. Council social housing must be affordable; for our current tenants, pensioners, vulnerable communities, and for the next generations. To charge market rents is a betrayal of citizens who need subsidised housing the most. Even a $7-$17 increase in rent paid will eat into the basic needs of those with little to spare and opens the door to further increases. Suitable housing is a human right and needs to be considered in terms of people lives first and foremost. Please stand with us and sign the petition. Even better, tell your local councillors to vote no for market rent on social housing. https://www.pncc.govt.nz/yourcouncil/mayor-and-councillors/councillors/
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Benjamin Schmidt Picture
  • Free Counselling for all Kiwis: Open Submission to the Mental Health Review
    “Depression and anxiety account for more of the misery in Western Societies than physical illness does … So the front line in the fight against misery is the fight against mental illness.”[1] Counselling and talk therapy is a highly effective treatment for mild to moderate depression and anxiety[2], and in many cases should be the first treatment offered. Yet despite this, it is not widely available and as a result many New Zealanders are not receiving adequate treatment for their mental health difficulties. Frustration with how hard it was to access talk therapy and counselling was one of the most common concerns expressed in the People’s Mental Health Review[3], with many saying they wanted to access talk therapy but were unable to due to cost and availability. https://youtu.be/X_80Zzl23YA Providing Free Counselling and Talk Therapy will enable more people to access treatment earlier, and as a result will take pressure off specialised psychiatric services, already overwhelmed. We know that treatment outcomes for all mental health problems are significantly improved by access to treatment earlier. Improved access to talk therapy and counselling will save money and save lives. With New Zealand having one of the highest levels of suicide in the OECD, we should be doing everything we can to provide treatment for those struggling with their mental health. While many will express concern about the envisioned cost of such an approach, a widely cited WHO-led 2016 study[4] showed, ‘Every US$ 1 invested in scaling up treatment for depression and anxiety leads to a return of US$ 4 in better health and ability to work’. Far from being a “pie in the sky” idea, fully funded counselling and talk therapy has been introduced in other countries, most notably in the UK via the “Increased Access to Psychological Therapies” or “IAPT” initiative. The growing recognition of the impact of the burden of mental health has meant many other nations are looking at how to implement such schemes. Let’s make Aotearoa a world leader in the provision of mental health care. Sign the Open Submission to support the call for Free Counselling and Talk Therapy for all Kiwis. 1. Layard, R and Clark, D. “Thrive: the Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies” (2014). Penguin Books 2. http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2012/08/psychotherapy-effective.aspx 3. https://www.peoplesmentalhealthreport.com 4. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2016/depression-anxiety-treatment/en/
    5,251 of 6,000 Signatures
    Created by Kyle MacDonald Picture
  • Stand Together for Social Work - Change the Registration Bill!
    Social work is an integral part of our health and social service sectors. Whether you think of a ward in a hospital, a women’s refuge, a primary health organisation, a school, emergency accommodation, child protection or one of a hundred other settings, we are there. Our profession brings a unique skill set to the table, synthesising theories of social work, social sciences, humanities and indigenous knowledges. Principles of social justice, human rights, collective responsibility and respect for diversities are central to social work. We are a strong and important profession, who play a vital role in supporting families and communities as well as challenging the systemic injustices that generate inequalities. We are worthy of recognition and protection from erosion, undervaluation and manipulation. Yet the Social Work Registration Bill currently before the house does not recognise the complexity and importance of our work. The Bill ignores the views of the overwhelming majority of the sector. It conveys a strong message that social work is vague, confusing, unimportant and fundamentally, unskilled. The Bill does not define or reference a scope of practice for social work. It makes registration virtually meaningless. And it means if your job title includes the words “social work” or “social worker”, you’re covered – and if it doesn’t, you aren’t. And as if that weren’t confusing enough, there are exemptions for some people even if they do have that job title. The end result: the public can’t be sure if the person they’re dealing with is qualified, skilled and accountable. We reject the idea repeated by the select committee and Ministers that the practice of social work is difficult to define. This work has been done by our international community and by our social work registration board. If anything else is needed we have more than enough skill and knowledge in our community to define and articulate our own work. It’s laughable to imagine a situation where an employer decides who can call themselves a nurse, or a dentist, or a lawyer. The same should apply for social work. It will create a situation where employers can pay lower wages and cut corners to avoid paying registration and supervision. It will only be a matter of time before this leads to a critical incident within our communities as the quality of practice is diminished in favour of affordability. This bill is outrageous and shows how far we still have to go in valuing work traditionally seen as “women’s work.” If you think that social work can be done by anyone and is not highly complex, skilled and emotionally demanding work we urge you to go into the field with a social worker. If you vote this bill through to law, you will cripple our profession. We urge you to urgently redraft the bill taking into account the views of those working in the sector. We are, after all, the experts in our own work. The Social Work Community of Aotearoa New Zealand and our allies. Social workers call for govt to scrap registration bill 24 April 2018 https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/355836/social-workers-call-for-govt-to-scrap-registration-bill Social work bill ‘nonsense’ - Dr Ian Hyslop, University of Auckland 24 April 2018 https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/04/23/106052/social-work-bill-nonsense# Social Workers Registration Legislation Bill https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_74844/tab/submissionsandadvice
    2,495 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Amy Ross Picture
  • Fair wages for Huckleberry workers
    Huckleberry is a chain of organic supermarkets that is rapidly expanding across New Zealand. It is owned and backed by the same group as EcoStore. Huckleberry workers are paid as little as 50c above the minimum wage. On the whole, Huckleberry workers are paid less than workers at most mainstream supermarkets. FIRST Union has been bargaining with Huckleberry since December 2017 for increased and better conditions. Union members originally asked to be paid the Living Wage (then $20.20 per hour), but this was refused. The Living Wage is the hourly wage a worker needs to pay for the necessities of life and participate as an active citizen in the community. It is calculated independently each year, and is currently 20.55 per hour. As it stands, many workers at Huckleberry struggle to pay their rent, or to afford the organic and ethical products they sell each day. Recently, the L'Oreal Distribution Centre in Mangere jumped from a the minimum wage to the Living Wage: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/103003822/loreal-to-pay-living-wage-in-mangere-distribution-centre Another New Zealand organic company, Tonzu, was the first Auckland-based employer to sign on to the Living Wage movement: http://tonzu.co.nz/about/living-wage/ Huckleberry has demonstrated that it has the resources to open new stores and expand its business. It should take a leaf from Tonzu's and L'Oreal's books and invest the resources to fairly pay its staff. FIRST Union members at Huckleberry are taking industrial action to support their cause. Your support would help a lot. Please sign the petition and share widely. More on the Living Wage: https://www.livingwage.org.nz/
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Stephen Parry
  • Provide a shelter for Rotorua homeless
    Rotorua is second to Auckland for its number of homeless.[1] Given the comparative size of the two cities and those elsewhere in the country, this constitutes a large proportion of the local population. Many of the homeless become particularly ill over winter. The majority of Rotorua's homeless prefer to live outdoors, but the weather takes its toll. Many are not use to living indoors, however they need a place of refuge near the city centre, when inclement weather occurs. They also need a place to wash, go to the toilet and a place to store such equipment as sleeping bags. An open sided shelter, with possibly one wall to provide privacy and protection from prevailing winds would provide more comfort and safety. The make up of homeless is complex and has indeed been exacerbated by the problem with housing unaffordability.[2] The reality is that while unaffordability of housing appears here to stay there is a large proportion of the population who simply do not know how to live in houses and sleep in our parks, under thermal pipes and for many in Rotorua on the verandah of the Tea House in the Government Gardens. Currently there are up to 110 who meet regularly at the Government Gardens where they are given an evening meal. A similar number receive an evening meal from the Love Soup initiative. Approaches have been made to the City Council. Unfortunately any requests to them appears to go under their radar. The fact that Phil Twyford, Minister for Housing, is alarmed at the homeless situation means possible pressure may come onto local Councils to do more. Consideration given to the setting up of a ministerial portfolio for the homeless, is possible in July. The vision for this petition is for land in a central location, ideally between the Lake and the Government Gardens, to be provided in an area out of sight from most residents and visitors to the city. A one walled shelter be built that would provide space sufficient for those needing to be out of the rain and a wall that provides not only privacy but protection from the wind be included. Additional consideration needs to be given to ablution amenities, showers, a laundry facility and changing rooms. These would be a long the lines of camping ground amenities. The Council would be responsible for the maintenance of the facility in the same way they do for other public amenities. The exception being these facilities would not be locked or closed in the evenings. 1 - Gina Peiffer, Rotorua Post April 23, 2017 2 - Rotorua Post Oct 14, 2017 3 - Homeless headcount finds 48 people sleeping rough in Rotorua http://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-daily-post/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503438&objectid=12007900 4 - Homelessness on the rise in Rotorua http://www.maoritelevision.com/news/regional/homelessness-on-rise-rotorua
    36 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Gary Parker
  • Save our bank and post office
    NZ Post and Kiwi Bank provide important services and it's not just mailing letters and banking money. But their "for profit" motive is being put before serving the New Zealand public. These are publicly owned businesses which should serve the public. Sadly, services are being cut, prices are going up and branches are closing all over the country. NZ Post has been closing branches for decades and the Newtown post office on Riddiford st is the next on the block. This would leave only the Kilbirnie post office and Kiwi Bank for all of the eastern suburbs. Everything from ID photos to car registration can be sorted at these offices. A one stop shop for many admin things is important for people, especially those with limited access to modern technology and limited mobility. Other than the obvious job losses these further closures will effect people badly. These State Owned Enterprises should be operating in the interests of the public, instead they are prioritising profit, often accompanied by cutting services, increasing costs, and closing outlets. It's time to organise and draw a line in the sand. Please sign this petition. If you would like to help with the campaign please email warwick.weatherman@gmail.com For recent media see http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1801/S00497/action-to-stop-the-closure-of-newtown-post-shopkiwibank.htm
    407 of 500 Signatures
    Created by James Barber
  • Eat Right Be Bright - School Lunch for All Kiwi Kids
    Sign our petition: We are a group of 100+ ordinary Mums from a variety of backgrounds. We believe passionately that all children are our children. That all children in New Zealand, wherever they are, whatever their circumstances, have the right to access their education on an equal footing and to nutritious food to nourish their mind, lives and spirit. We believe a centrally funded, secured, healthy school lunch programme for all is a powerful mechanism for New Zealand to fulfill these obligations to our children, to lift them up and break the poverty cycle. We are deeply concerned that: • 1 in 4 of our kids are living in poverty. • 1 in 3 of our kids are overweight or obese. • 1 in 3 of all kids admitted to Starship Hospital are malnourished to some degree. We know that minimum wage earning and beneficiary families need to spend up to 52% of their income to purchase a basic healthy diet (Otago University Food Costs Survey 2011); some reports put that now at 60%. We know that higher rates of diabetes, obesity, infectious diseases, fatigue, poor mental health, greater psychological stress and poor academic development in children are found where healthy food is less accessible. We know cheap, accessible food is energy rich but nutrient poor meaning children are malnourished whilst also obese. This does currently, and will increasingly, put a chronic strain on the public health system. We know that charities currently reach some children in need with their food programmes (of varying nutritional value) in deciles 1-4 schools. However, they are stretched and they cannot and should not be expected to shoulder the burden in perpetuity when all New Zealanders will benefit from healthy, well educated children. Teachers also tell us that children are going to school without lunch in all deciles or simply not attending school at all due to the shame of not having a lunch to bring. Kids such as Blake (not his real name). He moved to a new school when his family sought refuge in a Womens' Refuge Centre away from his old area. He knew that a charity delivered hot food to his old school two days a week in the winter. The following week after his move, Blake walked 7km to his old school because he knew there would be hot food there on that day. A teacher asked him why he had walked so far back to his old school. Blake answered that it was because he hadn't eaten a meal since he had changed schools and he was hungry. Or, like Ellie (not her real name), who goes to a school in an affluent neighbourhood. She often attends school without a lunch. The teachers started to sneak a lunch, from their own pockets, into her schoolbag as discreetly as they could. Ellie now hands back the teachers' lunch because she would rather be hungry than accept charity from others. We say, this stops now. Only a school lunch for all kids will capture every child in need, free from shame and stigma. All our children will benefit from the health and education uplift provided by a school lunch programme. For the children most in need, that uplift is greatest. Better educated and healthier children benefits all New Zealanders with less children needing doctors and more children being doctors. We know that New Zealand is one of the few countries in the world with no national, government funded school meals programme. In most countries around the world it is uncontroversial, part and parcel of going to school. We believe that all kiwi kids deserve the same social protection and investment in their lives as their global peers. We have decided it’s time to stand up and stand together for our children. It is clear to us that only with a centrally funded programme in all schools and early childhood education centres throughout our country will we reach all children in need, wherever they are, whatever their circumstance, free from shame and stigma. The provision of a school lunch as of right, with dignity, in this way tells a child that we, as a society, value them. The provision of daily healthy and nutritious food in a school lunch sets all children up for a healthier and better educated life. This benefits all of us. Eat Right Be Bright Join us in making change for a brighter future our children. Sign the petition. Find out more ways to help and follow us on: Facebook - @likeamumNZ or Eat Right Be Bright NZ Website - www.eatrightbebright.org.nz Instagram - @eatrightbebright_nz or eatrightbebrightn_z Twitter - @eatrightNZ
    4,804 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Becky Little